John F. Barber, PhD

News about my scholarship, teaching, and creative endeavors

News

News about my activities and efforts, 2011-present, with links to further information and resources.

2021 News

Radio Arts Works Broadcast by Lights Out Listening Group

Radio art. International. Juried. (Apr. 2021)
My archival website
Two of my radio art works, Slide Show of Sonic Specters and Bells and Bagpipes, were broadcast as part of Lights Out Lockdown Edition 7, 28 April 2021. These works were required to be less than 10 minutes in length and were jury selected from an international open call. LEARN more.

Flight Control, Memoriam-Flying Squirrel, and Riding the Rust Belt, were broadcast as part of Lights Out Lockdown Edition 6, 24 February 2021.

Last year, COVID Nightmares and Music Heard from Space While Admiring a View from a Hill, were broadcast as part of Lights Out Lockdown Edition 5, 16 December 2020.

Beginning-Middle-End and Tiny Sounds, were broadcast as part of Lights Out Lockdown Edition 4, 30 September 2020.

Dogs Bark Far Away was broadcast as Lights Out Lockdown Edition 3, 29 July 2020.

All works broadcast were jury selected from an international open call. Each work could not be longer than 10 minutes.

Promoted to Professor

Professional. International. Juried. (Apr. 2021)
I was promoted to professor, the highest rank of academic achievement. Listen to what Dr. Christine Portfors, Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Education, said about my achievements.

Re-Imagined Radio Broadcasted Storytelling with Sounds

Radio art performance. (15 Mar. 2021)
Archival website
My Re-Imagined Radio project broadcasted Storytelling with Sounds, 15 March 2021, on KXRW.FM radio, Vancouver, Washington. Storytelling with Sounds explored how sounds, like the storyteller's voice and sound effects, have contributed to storytelling throughout human history and provided some interesting listening examples. Re-Imagined Radio explores radio as a medium for community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Update

KMWV FM, Salem, Oregon, began broadcasting Re-Imagined Radio as a weekly program, 7 April 2021. The first episode broadcast was Storytelling with Sounds.

Re-Imagined Radio Broadcasted Affairs of the Heart

Radio art performance. (11 Feb. 2021)
Archival website
My Re-Imagined Radio project broadcasted Affairs of the Heart, 11 February 2021, on KXRW.FM radio, Vancouver, Washington. Affairs of the Heart sampled a 2019 live performance by actors from Metropolitan Performing Arts and other community volunteers to address the travails we endure, the stories we tell ourselves, the results we never expect when dealing with love. Re-Imagined Radio exploes radio as a medium for community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Feb. 2021)
My review of Nothing But the Music: Documentaries from Night Clubs, Dance Halls & A Tailor's Shop in Dakar by Thulani Davis, was published, February 2021. As I said in my review, "In her latest poetry collection Davis provides synesthetic, documentary insight, a sonic-social history full of anecdotal and impressionistic responses to embodied experience of the music and its creators and followers in the places and times of its creation and sharing.

"Davis goes aggressively for the jugular of the experience, following the soaring cycles and spirited flashes of inspired but ephemeral circuits of creativity as performed by the musicians, dancers, poets, and choreographers she chronicles in these poems. She is drawn to document the raw feelings, the smoke in the air and empty bottles on the floor, the impulsive energy, the dance to celebrate humanity."

Update

I was invited to read my review as part of "Episode 02: The Expansion of Borders" of the Between Art and Science podcast from Leonardo/International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology. Leonardo/ISAST seeks to amplify the ideas and work of transdisciplinary artists, creators, makers, and thinkers working in the spaces between art, sciences, and technology.
LEARN more about this podcast.

Chapter Published in Electronic Literature as Digital Humanities

Book chapter. Peer reviewed. (28 Jan. 2021)
My essay, "Electronic Literature and Sound," was published in Electronic Literature as Digital Humanities: Contexts, Forms, and Practices, edited by James O'Sullivan and Dene Grigar, Bloomsbury Press. In this chapter, I outline a central role for sound in contexts, forms, and practices of electronic literature (eLit). An important context is Marshall McLuhan's notion of ground and figure, the central position of speech in all forms of communication, and the appeal of sound to promote shared literary experiences. Radio, and its sound-based content, may provide models for new forms of eLit based on listening and may inform future eLit practices. If sounds can provide valid literary experiences and promote new works of eLit, then we can locate narrative and storytelling not solely in reading and writing, but also in the act of listening.

Re-Imagined Radio Broadcasted New Year's Eve

Radio art performance. (14 Jan. 2021)
Archival website
My Re-Imagined Radio project broadcasted New Year's Eve, 14 January 2021, on KXRW.FM radio, Vancouver, Washington. New Year's Eve sampled New Year's Eve episodes of The Whistler and Guy Lombardo's New Year's Eve Party to celebrate the start of 2021. Re-Imagined Radio investigates radio for community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Presentation Accepted for Library of Congress Conference

Presentation. International. (Oct. 2020)
Postponed until October 2021 by COVID-19. My presentation "Preservation through Re-Creation: Re-Newing Radio as Community Storytelling" was accepted for the A Century of Broadcasting: Preservation and Renewal conference to be held at the Library of Congress, Washington, DC, 22-24 October 2020. I proposed preservation through re-creation, specifically re-imagining and re-performing historical radio dramas as a form of community storytelling for live audiences. I will discuss these ideas through the lens of my creative practice research project, Re-Imagined Radio. In recognition of the 82nd anniversary of its original broadcast quite close to this conference, I will frame my remarks around past and planned Re-Imagined Radio performances of The War of the Worlds broadcast. LEARN more.

Chapter Forthcoming in Social Knowledge Creation

Book chapter. International. (2021)
Publication website
My essay, "Future Radio and Social Knowledge Creation in the Humanities," will be published in Social Knowledge Creation in the Humanities, Vol. 2, edited by Aaron Mauro (Iter Press). The collection will be published by Iter Press later this year. My essay begins by describing how radio, historically, as a technology, culture, and ecology of practices, has been characterized by its one-producer-to-many-consumers model of content production and distribution. Little to no opportunity has been provided for listeners to answer back or contribute their own content to the broadcast stream. Future radio, with its content production and distribution digitized, may provide opportunities for listeners to participate as parallel broadcasters. To explore this potential, I worked with students to conceptualize and build a prototype for a web-based radio ecology that would foreground social collaboration and creation of sound-based content. These efforts led to consideration of a radio-social network where, through discussion about "social objects" (focal points, objects), knowledge could be created. This essay explores the potentialities of future radio's digital functionality and affordances, and how they might be used for social knowledge creation in the humanities.

Social Knowledge Creation in the Humanities addresses the relationship between social media, open access, collaboration, and crowdsourcing in the humanities. The speed, ubiquity, and diversity of online platforms, tools, techniques, and interactions have generated and continue to inform distinct cultures of knowledge creation. Moreover, the social, institutional, and cultural changes within the academy have fundamentally reshaped knowledge creation and scholarly communication. The collection seeks to present a snapshot of this emergent discourse as well as to describe how social knowledge creation is transforming the humanities. Comments on the online materials, including my essay, are welcome. Social Knowledge Creation in the Humanities was first published online, as an open access anthology, followed by two print volumes. My essay will be included in the second volume. LEARN more.

2020 News

Re-Imagined Radio Broadcasted A Radio Christmas Carol

Radio art performance. (24 Dec. 2020)
Archival website
My Re-Imagined Radio project broadcasted A Radio Christmas Carol, 24 December 2020, on KXRW.FM radio, Vancouver, Washington. A Radio Christmas Carol is our traditional, annual holiday community performance. Re-Imagined Radio investigates radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Essay Published in ICIDS 2019 Art Exhibition Book

Multimedia. International. (Dec. 2020)
My artist essay regarding Remembering the Dead was published in a book documenting the art exhibition in conjunction with the International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling (ICIDS), Snowbird, Utah, 19-22 November 2019. ICIDS is the premier conference for theory and practice from a number of different perspectives of using digital forms of interactive narrative for digital storytelling. The exhibition theme was "The Expression of Emotion in Humans and Technology." LEARN more.

COVID Dreamscapes Broadcast on Framework Radio

Radio art broadcast. International. Juried. (Dec. 2020)
My archival website
My radio art, COVID Dreamscapes, was broadcast on Framework Radio as episode #738, 13-19 December 2020. COVID Dreamscapes is a 57:00 sonic narrative of dreams prompted by the COVID-19. Uses field recordings and found sounds to portray spiraling sonic mashups both real and imagined associated with my personal COVID dreams. Featuring juried work by international sound artists, Framework Radio presents not only the extremely diverse sound environments of our world, but also the extremely diverse work produced by the artists who choose to use these environments as their sonic sources. LEARN more.

Re-Imagined Radio Broadcasted The Skyjacker

Radio art performance. (24 Nov. 2020)
Archival website
My Re-Imagined Radio project broadcasted The Skyjacker, 24 November 2020, on KXRW.FM radio, Vancouver, Washington. The Skyjacker is the third radio drama by Dan Wyatt, Jr. focusing on D. B. Cooper, the mysterious man who parachuted from a hijacked passenger jet airliner over Southwest Washington with $200,000 in cash. Re-Imagined Radio investigates radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Essay Published in ELO 2018 Conference Proceedings

Publication. International. Peer reviewed. (Nov. 2020)
My essay, "Listening to Electronic Literature: Sounds at the heart of works by Jeremy Hight, Stuart Moulthrop, and Mohamed Habibi," developed from my presentation at the Electronic Literature Organization 2018 international conference, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Canada, 14 August 2018, was published in Proceedings of the 2018 Symposium, in EPUB format with a proper ISBN. My essay positions sound at the center of pioneering works of electronic literature by Hight and Moulthrop and then extends this argument to the video poetry of Mohammed Habibi, a Saudi Arabian poet and scholar, saying it provides knowledge of and experience with electronic literature representing Arab creators and consumers. Specifically, I argue that sound is an essential component of Habibi's works, more so than the images presented. Habibi's sound-based video poetry demonstrates how sound connects and surrounds us with multiple, concurrent narratives. The result is a deeper, richer literary experience, prompted largely by the active engagement of our imaginations to express another sense or esoteric meaning, beyond visualization, regarding the work. DOWNLOAD portal.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Oct. 2020)
My review of A New History of the Future in 100 Objects: A Fiction by Adrian Hon, was published, October 2020. As I said in my review, "A History of the World in 100 Objects is ingeniously imaginative in its detailing the things the future might leave behind. In his descriptions of these objects, Hon both reminisces about our current state and prompts us to think about what might become. The future after all belongs to what we create. Smart readers will want to act before it is too late."

A Mighty Span Featured in Electronic Literature Conference Media Art Exhibition

Exhibition. International. Juried. (July 2020)
My sound-based narrative, A Mighty Span, was jury selected for an exhibition, curated by Anastasia Salter and Shannon Lindsay, as part of the Electronic Literature Organization International Conference Media Art Exhibition, University of Central Florida, 16-19 July 2020. The exhibition, (un)Continuity: A Virtual Exhibition, included many jury selected works by international digital media artists.

A Mighty Span responds to the conference theme of "(un)continuity," the invitation to explore fluidity, re/presentation, and sound. The work draws inspiration from early radio news reporting and documentary and oral history to re/present sound-based narrative as a non-binary literary event. By providing a portal into orality, engaging audiences in listening, and exploring sound as a fundamental component of narrative and literary experience, A Mighty Span explores a mode of communications reliant on storytelling, listening, and collaboration. We hear voices on the radio as the people speaking, as the persons they are, rather than personas depicted on a screen. Radio allows us to re/position ourselves, to be present, to re/present being interpersonal.

By bringing sound(s) to the forefront, A Mighty Span argues sound central to the literary experience. Sound puts one in the environment, the world, being depicted, helps one to navigate that space, and promotes believable experience of action and agency there. This is facilitated by hearing and listening, both participatory practices, wherein sound seizes / stimulates the imagination, promotes reflective inquiry, and prompts conceptual changes. LEARN more.

Say Their Names Released

Sound Art. International. Collaborative. (June 2020)
My archival website
Say Their Names, a sound-based memorial to people killed by police officers in the United States, was released. Inspired by the global protests against police racism, violence, brutality, and murder following the death of George Floyd, a 45 year old Black man while detained by officers of the Minneapolis Police Department, Say Their Names responds to the popular protest call to name, and thus remember the victims of police violence. The work is accessible using a Web browser and is updated frequently. LEARN more.

Essay Published in IDEAH Journal

Essay. International. Juried. (June 2020)
My essay, Walking A Transect: Exploring Soundscapes as Sites for Digital Humanities Research and Creative Practice, was published in Interdisciplinary Digital Engagement in Arts & Humanities (IDEAH), Vol. 1, no. 1, 2020. DOI: https://doi.org/10.21428/f1f23564.ef360075

This essay describes walking a transect, my variant of soundwalking, and recording samples of sounds encountered along a path through an acoustic environment. These sound samples are then assembled into a sound collage representing the soundscape of its origin. Sound-based compositions made in this manner may be useful for exploring human endeavors and relationships with the natural world. In this regard, exploring soundscapes by walking a transect provides interesting opportunities for Digital Humanities research and creative practice.

Interviewed by KXRW Radio about Re-Imagined Radio

Interview. Local. (June 2020)
I was interviewed by Joe Clemons, host of The Common Good, KXRW FM Radio, Vancouver, WA, regarding my Re-Imagined Radio project. The interview focused on the project's re-imagined performance of the classic radio drama, The War of the Worlds. The interview was broadcast 9 July, and is available at the archival website maintained by XRAY FM radio.

Coho Crossing Broadcast on Framework Radio

Radio art broadcast. International. Juried. (Apr. 2020)
My archival website
My radio art, Coho Crossing, was broadcast on Framework Radio as episode #711, 26 April - 2 May 2020. Coho Crossing uses multiple field recordings to provide a sonic narrative of a journey across the Strait of Juan de Fuca, between Canada and the United States, aboard the ferry M/V Coho. Featuring juried work by international sound artists, Framework Radio presents not only the extremely diverse sound environments of our world, but also the extremely diverse work produced by the artists who choose to use these environments as their sonic sources.

Chapter Published in Doing More Digital Humanities

Scholarship. International. Peer reviewed. (2020)
My essay, "Doing Digital Humanities with Digital Storytelling," was published in Doing More Digital Humanities: Open Approaches to Creation, Growth, and Development, edited by onstance Crompton, Richard J. Lane, and Raymond Siemens, (Routledge Press). My chapter focuses on using digital storytelling to promote new frameworks and creative practices for scholarship, teaching, and learning. Three approaches to digital storytelling, oral history, podcasting, and multimedia, are discussed. Resources are provided. The chapter concludes with the idea that doing digital humanities with digital storytelling can promote teaching and learning practices focused on critical thinking, communication, digital literacy, and civic engagement.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Mar. 2020)
My review of Sound Art Revisited by Alan Licht, was published, March 2020. As I said in my review, "Licht says the state of sound art in the 21st century is closely connected to listening to sounds from people, from each other, and from inanimate objects, history, and the environment. The fundamental concept of sound art, he says, is to frame sound within society, rather than, as he suggested in the first edition of this book, Sound Art: Beyond Music, Between Categories, a subset of the sonic planet as a whole. Listening to sounds can be, Licht concludes, regarded as a tool for understanding human culture, past and present. What remains is 'to reconcile the human and the universal within the scope of sound and create new sound art works that possess a balanced sense of the genre's past, present, and future' (157). Sound Art Revisited provides a worthy road map and resource."

Essay Published in Radio Anthology

Book chapter. International. (Feb. 2020)
My essay, "'The War of the Worlds' Broadcast: Fake News, or Engaging Storytelling?", was published in Radio's Second Century: A Reader, edited by John A. Hendricks. The anthology, one of the first books to examine the status of radio broadcasting on its one hundredth anniversary, was published by Rutgers University Press. "The War of the Worlds" radio drama is often called a hoax for its use of fictional news reporting style and break-in news announcements to move the narrative forward. But, other radio dramas used this trope previously. This essay examined each for inspiration and prototypes leading up to "The War of the Worlds" as exemplary engaging radio storytelling.

Proposal Accepted for Electronic Literature Conference

Presentation. International. (Feb. 2020)
My collaborative proposal, with Dene Grigar and Richard Holeton, "radioELL Presents: A Live Internet Radio Performance of Richard Holeton's Figurski at Findhorn on Acid", was accepted for presentation at the upcoming Electronic Literature Organization International Conference, University of Central Florida, Orland, Florida, 16-19 July 2020. Holeton is the author of the hypertext electronic literature work, Figurski at Findhorn on Acid (Eastgate Systems, 2001). Grigar directs the Electronic Literature Lab, and is noted for her efforts to archive, preserve, and restore pioneering works of electronic literature. Holeton provided a traversal of his work in February 2019 at the Electronic Literature Lab. LEARN more at the ELL website.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Feb. 2020)
My review of American Steam Locomotives: Design and Development, 1880-1960 by William Within, was published, February 2020. As I said in my review, "In an age of jet airplane travel, railroads in America are an afterthought, and steam locomotives a curiosity at theme parks or special travel venues. Still, steam locomotives capture our imagination, representing as they do a different time, a different technology than that we favor currently. From the development of steam power on railroads mid-nineteenth century to the end of its innovation and production one hundred years later, this is a complex story within a larger context of technological, cultural, and aesthetic changes. Withuhn weaves these strands deftly into a well-researched historical account, an insightful memoir, an authoritative reference work accessible to a broad range of audiences. American Steam Locomotives is recommended. Good for browsing as well as research. Interesting for the engineer as well as the artist."

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Jan. 2020)
My review of Understanding Records: A Field Guide to Recording Practices by Jay Hodgson, was published, January 2020. As I said in my review, "Understanding Records is not just a field guide for recording, producing, and/or listening to musical performances and/or records. It is also a transdisciplinary inspiration for anyone wanting to record sound(s) as part of a research, scholarship, or creative practice. The steps and techniques explained and made accessible by Hodgson will be valuable to professionals, educators, and interested readers as well, who will find this book, a worthy read and listen, both engaging and informative."

Works Included in Wrong Digital Art Biennale

Media Art. International. (Nov. 2019-Mar. 2020)
Two sound art works of mine were included in the Wrong Digital Art Biennale, a global art and media project to nurture contemporary digital culture consisting of multiple parts, distributed globally, ranging from gallery shows and exhibitions to DIY gatherings, 1 November-1 March 2020. The first, We Can See Edith by Radio, was jury selected as part of Disjunction Notice, a poetry archive curated by Colin Post at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The archive is hosted on a Wrong Router, a self-contained, offline router that provides local WiFi access, display, and distribution of hosted digital art to anyone within its limited range. This allows the showcase of digital art without the need of Internet, wall space or screen set ups. The archived works begin from disjunction rather than connection as the operating principle. My second work, Ecoustics, is hosted on my own Wrong Router, at Washington State University Vancouver.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented The Maltese Falcon

Radio art performance. (22 Jan. 2020)
My Re-Imagined Radio project presented The Maltese Falcon, 22 January 2020, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. This radio adaptation of the most famous Dashiell Hammett novel provided hard boiled detective drama with just enough noir. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre, and Metropolitan Performing Arts investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

2019 News

Re-Imagined Radio Presented A Christmas Carol

Radio art performance. (18 Dec. 2019)
My Re-Imagined Radio project presented A Christmas Carol, 22 December 2019, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. This was the seventh annual performance of this classic tale of redemption and now a community tradition. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre, and Metropolitan Performing Arts investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented In Flight with D. B. Cooper

Radio art performance. (27 Nov. 2019)
My Re-Imagined Radio project presented In Flight with D. B. Cooper, 27 November 2019, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. "D. B. Cooper" was the name given to an unknown man who hijacked a passenger jet enroute from Portland, Oregon to Seattle, Washington, Thanksgiving eve, 1971. Many mysteries surround this case of air piracy, which remains unsolved, the only such case in American history. This performance considered one: the relationship between Cooper and Tina Mucklow, a stewardess aboard the hijacked airplane. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre, Metropolitan Performing Arts and KXRW-FM, investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Remembering the Dead Exhibited at ICIDS 2019

Multimedia. International. (19-22 Nov. 2019)
My multimedia memorial to victims of mass shootings in America, Remembering the Dead, was exhibited in conjunction with the International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling (ICIDS) 2019 and its theme "The Expression of Emotion in Humans and Technology." ICIDS is the premier conference for theory and practice focused on digital interactive forms of narrative from a variety of perspectives. LEARN more.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Nov. 2019)
My review of Hush: Media and Sonic Self Control by Mack Hagood, was published, October 2019. As I said in my review, "Hagood traces media technologies, from bedside white noise machines, tinnitus maskers, LPs that play ocean sounds, apps that play nature sounds, noise canceling headphones, and in-ear technologies, to argue that the purpose of such technologies is not information transmission, but rather control, how we might create sonic safe places for ourselves." The pursuit of happiness through control can provide freedoms, says Hagood, but also new assaults and sensitivities. Hagood concludes, saying, rather than further engineering the narrow freedom to hear what we want, we can develop and use technologies that free us from aversion and indifference, that shape our listening and provide sonic technologies for a listening freedom beyond control, wanting what we hear rather than hearing what we want.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented Halloween Fright Night

Radio art performance. (30 Oct. 2019)
My Re-Imagined Radio project presented Halloween Fright Night, 30 October 2019, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. The program featured five acts sampled from Lights Out, Quiet, Please!, and Suspense, each a popular horror or fright series during the Golden Age of Radio. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre, Metropolitan Performing Arts and KXRW-FM, investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Oct. 2019)
My review of Tokyo Listening: Sound and Sense in a Contemporary City by Lorraine Plourde, was published, October 2019. As I said in my review, "Moving between two sonic contexts, corporately managed background music and independent classical music cafes, Tokyo Listening examines the management behind the city's sound textures, and its effects on those who listen as they work, shop, and relax. Plourde's findings can tune reader's ears to the complex, chaotic, cluttered use of sound(s) to manage, heal, and sustain city dwellers as they live their lives in Japan's major city. The end result is new understanding and appreciation of sound and urban spaces, Japanese anthropological and ethnomusicological studies, the impact of sound in everyday life, and connections between disparate listening cultures."

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Oct. 2019)
My review of Ways of Hearing by Damon Krukowski, was published, October 2019. As I said in my review, "Ways of Hearing is interesting and successful on several levels. First, it is an excellent transcription from an audio-based to a text/image-based medium, from a podcast to a book. It is thought provoking in its challenge for readers to become more attentive of what they might hear. And finally, Ways of Hearing elevates attentive, contemplative listening as a way of extending the human sensorium to enhance our interaction with the world through technology. Hearing involves awareness of surrounding sounds. Listening, paying attention to what we hear, elevates our engagement with those sounds and all they have to offer. By listening closely, writes Krukowski, 'we might discover more about what is meaningful signal for each of us. And how we might best share those signals with one another' (133)."

Sound Spheres Exhibited at ACM Hypertext 2019

Multimedia. International. (Sep. 2019)
My archival website
My sound art project, Sound Spheres, was jury selected for exhibition during the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Hypertext 2019 conference, 17-20 September 2019, at the Institute of Information Systems, Hof University, Hof, Germany.

Print-based hypertext, in use throughout the history of the World Wide Web, provides links (specially coded words or phrases) with which users can navigate through online information structures. Since its introduction, hypertext theory and practice has moved in many directions. With its theme "Hypertext—Tear Down the Wall," which echoes the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, Hypertext 2019 sought to reunite different hypertext directions and communities.

Sound Spheres, one of nine creative works selected for the exhibition, experiments with using sounds, rather than text, as the link. Interacting with sound spheres prompts users to consider participatory, sound-based narratives. Sound Spheres is a web-based interactive installation created in collaboration with Greg Philbrook. LEARN more.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Sep. 2019)
My review of Hybrid Practices: Art in Collaboration with Science and Technology in the Long 1960s edited by David Cateforis, Steven Duval, and Shepherd Steiner, was published, September 2019. As I said in my review, "The hybrid practices featured in this collection speak to collaboration and participation, between disciplines and between presenters and audiences. They speak to a fluidity of working in and across scientific, artistic, and performance disciplines. Hybrid Practices certainly provides context for contemporary hybrid practices, but readers are left with more, an ecology of echoes, analogues, and extensions, all pointing toward future hybrid practices."

Potential Stories Included on CD Release

Sound art. International. (Aug. 2019)
My sound art project, Potential Stories, was included on Muted Stories 4, a CD released 11 Aug. 2019 by and/OAR. Potential Stories is a 3:45 sound collage narrative exploring stories begun, overhead in bits, but never completed. Despite lower audio fidelity, another way of being muted, each story promises a special quality, mystery, or engaging narrative experience that remains unknown as the story is always a potential, never completed, cut short, muted at its beginning. Muted Stories 4 features eleven tracks, each exploring the individual artist's response to the theme of "muted stories." The CD, downloadable from the Bandcamp website, is produced and distributed by Dale Lloyd of and/OR, specializing in environmental sound and various forms of avant-garde sound art, Seattle, Washington.

Sound Spheres Exhibited at Glucksman Gallery, Cork, Ireland

Multimedia. International. (July 2019)
My archival website
My sound art project, Sound Spheres, was jury selected for exhibition in The Lewis Glucksman Gallery, as part of the Electronic Literature Organization 2019 Conference & Media Art Festival. The exhibition, entitled Peripheries: Electronic Literature and New Media Art, was offered 15-17 July 2019. The Glucksman is a prestigious national institution of the contemporary arts on the campus of University College Cork, in Cork, Ireland. Sound Spheres is a web-based interactive installation, created in collaboration with Greg Philbrook, that combines computational digital media and storytelling techne to explore interactive, participatory sound-based narratives. LEARN more.

Presentation at Electronic Literature Organization 2019 Conference

Presentation. International. (July 2019)
Program and Book of Abstracts
My presentation, "eLit User Experience: Audience+Purpose=Design," was selected for the Electronic Literature Organization 2019 Conference & Media Art Festival program. The conference will be held at University College Cork, Ireland, 15-17 July 2019. This presentation suggests that attention to audience, purpose, and design can help promote more efficient and effective user experience with electronic literature. Attention to thinking about the audience and their experience may help move electronic literature from the peripheries, while attracting users who themselves may be on the sidelines.

Presentation Delivered at DHSI 2019 Colloquium

Presentation. International. (June 2019)
I delivered a presentation during the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI) 2019 Colloquium, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada, 5 June 2019. A Mighty Span, remediates historical textual and visual materials as a live radio broadcast of the opening ceremonies for the Interstate Bridge, the first automobile bridge across the Columbia River between Portland, Oregon, and Vancouver, Washington, and only the second to span the river at all, 14 February 1917. This presentation is connected to the classes I taught at DHSI this year, Sounds and Digital Humanities, which explores opportunities and approaches for sound in Digital Humanities scholarship and pedagogy, and Digital Storytelling, which explores combining computational technologies and digital media with storytelling techne to prompt rewarding scholarship, teaching, and creative practices.

Presentation and Workshop Delivered at SpokenWeb 2019

Presentations. International. (May 2019)
I presented "A Mighty Span: Sound, Practice, Community," at SpokenWeb Symposium, Simon Fraser University, Harbour Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 30-31 May 2019. This presentation considered the symposium's three operative terms—sound, practice, and community—in context of A Mighty Span, my imagined live radio broadcast of the opening ceremonies for the Interstate Bridge, the first to connect Portland, Oregon, and Vancouver, Washington, across the Columbia River, 14 February 1917.

Additionally, I facilitated a workshop on Oral History during the symposium. I approached oral history as narrative told from multiple points of view. It is always unfinished as there is always another person from whom one can learn more. This subjective perspective is a productive resource for literary historical study, digital development, and critical and pedagogical engagement with diverse collections of spoken webs comprised of recordings and/or aural experiences. Finally, as a pliant and ever evolving web of spoken information, oral history can provide new forms of knowledge discovery, scholarship, and mobilization.

Brautigan Library Featured on Radio France International

Interview. International. (Apr. 2019)
I was interviewed by Anna Corpet for Radio France Internationale (RFI) regarding my The Brautigan Library project. RFI broadcasts around the world from Paris, France. Corpet is the American correspondent for RFI. Web article here. Follow @annecorpet on Twitter.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (May 2019)
My review of Modern Records, Maverick Methods: Technology and Process in Popular Music Record Production 1978-2000 by Samantha Bennett was published, May 2019.

As I said in my review, "Bennett's book seeks to be transformative by unraveling the influence of recordists, technology, and process on popular music recordings from this period. Bennett contextualizes music and sound recording through the 1980s and 1990s, examines recordist attitudes, and establishes a continuum of technological and processual landmarks. Throughout, Bennett provides loads of details and analysis in her diverse linkage of process, technology, and the people whose maverick methods sought to combine and overlay analogue and digital technologies so to produce modern sounds in rapidly changing studio environments. Bennett presents them as linked, a continuum rather than individual accomplishments in this fresh and insightful perspective."

Re-Imagined Radio Presented SciFI, SciFACTS

Radio art performance. (17 Apr. 2019)
My Re-Imagined Radio project took a new twist of the tuning dial with a live performance of SciFI, SciFACTS, 17 April 2019, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. The program featured two acts sampled from science fiction radio drama, The Junkyard by Clifford D. Simak, overlain by conversations with Washington State University Vancouver scientists John Harkness, a postdoctoral researcher in neuroscience, and Marc Kramer, associate professor in the School of Environment. Harkness talked about how memories are formed, stored, altered, updated and forgotten. Kramer talked about causes and consequences of climate change. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre, Metropolitan Performing Arts and KXRW-FM, investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Dissertation Committee and Artist Talk, University of Colorado Boulder

Service and invited artist talk. (Apr. 2019)
My service as the external member of Ryan Ruehlen's dissertation committee closed as Ruehlen successfully defended his doctoral dissertation, 9 April 2019, at University of Colorado Boulder. Dr. Ruehlen's dissertation, Georhymthic Drift Music, within the Intermedia Art, Writing, and Performance program, focused on deep listening research and involved field experiments investigating Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio emissions, unmanned aerial vehicles, and impromptu sound art performances transmitted to remote listening stations. LEARN more.

While in Boulder, I delivered an invited artist talk to students and guests of IAWP 6700: Digital Fiction, taught by international net artist Mark Amerika, where I talked about my work with sound art and radio, and digital storytelling.

Essay Published in KULA

Essay. International. (Feb. 2019)
My essay, Digital Storytelling and Open, Networked Social Scholarship: A Narrative, was published in KULA: Knowledge Creation, Dissemination, and Preservation Studies (vol. 3, no. 1, p. 17, DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/kula.37, https://kula.uvic.ca/articles/10.5334/kula.37/) as part of a special collection focusing on proceedings from the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) 2018 international conference with its theme Beyond Open: Implementing Social Scholarship. The challenge of that conference was networked open social scholarship engagement and implementation. My essay suggests one approach to this challenge is to distribute scholarly communication as storytelling through multiple digital media channels and describes potential outcomes from digital, open, social scholarship. KULA is a peer-reviewed, open access journal, meant to encourage the formation of a multi-disciplinary community of scholars studying human knowledge processes through the ages, concerned to understand their role in the full sweep of human civilizations, and to project them into the future from both humanistic and technological perspectives. LEARN more.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented Affairs of the Heart

Radio art performance. (14 Feb. 2019)
My Re-Imagined Radio project presented a live performance of the radio drama Affairs of the Heart with Lonesome Gal, 14 February 2014, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. The Valentine's Day performance sampled five romantic radio dramas from the 1940s and 1950s to create an entertaining sound-based narrative about love. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre, Metropolitan Performing Arts and KXRW-FM, investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

"Martians, Moustaches, and Radio Drama" Published in Leonardo Electronic Almanac

Essay. International. (Feb. 2019)
My essay, Martians, Moustaches, and Radio Drama: A Case Study for Sound Art Curation by Re-Creation, was published in Leonardo Electronic Almanac (vol. 22, no. 3, Dec. 2018. Print publication by The MIT Press will follow.). This essay describes my curation of historic radio dramas by re-creating them before live audiences. A case study of a re-created performance of the 1938 radio drama The War of the Worlds is at the center of the essay, surrounded by a theoretical framework and discussion. This essay concludes that curation by re-creation, beyond simply listening, provides a fuller, richer, more engaging experience with historic radio drama by communicating ideas about its creation and consumption through the medium of its exhibition.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Feb. 2019)
My review of Guerrilla Networks: An Anarchaeology of 1970s Radical Media Ecologies by Michael Goddard was published, February 2019.

As I said in my review, "Guerrilla Networks succeeds in extending contemporary theoretical orientations with regard to media ecologies and archaeologies and their connections with political questions and system materialities. This is relevant, and important as we increasingly face the challenges and hazards of guerrilla information war using manipulated and weaponized content in an increasingly digital world that contextualizes the social, political, economic, and creative ecologies in which we frame contemporary life."

Essay Published in Hyperrhiz: New Media Cultures

Essay. International. (Jan. 2019)
Publication website
My essay, "(Remixed) Test Pattern for Listening: Sound Poetry as Electronic Literature," was published in Hyperrhiz: New Media Cultures, no. 19, Winter 2019. This essay explores test cases, "test patterns," using non-vocal yet still generative and combinatory sound(s), to provide, through performance, expressive and material practices that re/trans-mix/create/code perspectives on sound poetry and electronic literature. LEARN more.

American Dust Wins Open Scholarship Award

Award. International. Peer reviewed. (16 Jan. 2019)
My longtime and ongoing research project, American Dust: Richard Brautigan's Life and Writing, was awarded a 2019 Honorable Mention Award by the Canadian Social Knowledge Institute (C-SKI).

Open scholarship incorporates open access, open data, open education, and other related movements that have the potential to make scholarly work more efficient, more accessible, and more usable by those within and beyond the academy. By engaging with open practices for academic work, open scholarship shares that work more broadly and more publicly.

Richard Gary Brautigan (1935-1984), a Washington native, was an American writer popular during the 1960s-1970s. His writing characterized the cultural electricity in San Francisco, California, during the ebbing of the Beat Generation and the emergence of the counterculture movement.

Brautigan's bibliography is quite extensive—ten novels, ten poetry collections, and one collection of short stories, as well as four volumes of collected work, nonfiction writing, and a spoken voice record album. Response to his writing is also extensive—reviews, criticism, studies, and creative practices. But, as with any research and scholarship, access to source materials is an overarching concern.

Information about Brautigan is disparate, difficult to collate, and often ephemeral. American Dust solves this problem by collecting, curating, and contextualizing this information in an online, web-based repository. This open information resource is provided freely, without financial or technical barriers, within guidelines as provided by open scholarship and Fair Use.

Publication, background, and other information for each of Brautigan's works is provided. Citations, annotated reviews, many with full text, are available. A chronology for each decade of Brautigan's life provides context for his writing. Information is interlinked and annotated.

American Dust is an online, comprehensive scholarly resource about Richard Brautigan's life and writing, freely available under open access and Fair Use guidelines. The purpose is to make this information more efficient, more accessible, and more usable by sharing it broadly and publicly with other scholars, researchers, readers, and fans. "American Dust" is registered with OCLC WorldCat (#1054104600) and has its own DOI (doi.org/10.7273/nvgh-ca61).

The Canadian Social Knowledge Institute, in making the award, noted that my work with American Dust exhibits an innovative approach to open access, open peer-reviewed scholarship, and open information sharing so to make scholarly work more efficient, more accessible, and more usable for scholars, researchers, teachers, students, and fans. LEARN more.

Presentation at Modern Language Association 2019 Conference

Conference. International. Peer reviewed. (4 Jan. 2019)
Conference Program
I delivered a presentation, "Remembering the Dead," at the Modern Language Association 2019 international conference, Chicago, 4 January 2019. My presentation was part of Health Humanities and Digital Life (session #203), an interdisciplinary roundtable exploring the interarticle of medical and health humanities with the digital humanities. Remembering the Dead is an online memorial to victims of mass shootings in America. Taking an activist approach, this work highlights the victims by displaying and speaking their names. Permanence for the victims' memories is sought through hearing and reflection. The intent is to direct attention toward the national health issue of loss of human life by gun homicide and move thinking toward realistic solutions to this and other forms of violence. LEARN more.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Jan. 2019)
My review of Digital Sound Studies edited by Mary Caton Lingold, Darren Mueller, and Whitney Trettien was published, January 2019.

As I said in my review, "Digital sound studies is a new, interdisciplinary field, driven by experimental modes, prompting action/creative research at the interarticle of print and sound and digital humanities. The essays collected in Digital Sound Studies explore the urgency and necessity of incorporating sonic experience into scholarly networks, writing processes, research methodologies, pedagogies, and knowledges of the archive. The results will be transformative, say the editors, and will create, by giving voice to thought, 'the possibility for new kinds of understanding that can do justice to forms of sonic knowledge: the ancient, the fledgling, the yet-to-be-imagined'" (ix).

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Jan. 2019)
My review of High Static, Dead Lines: Sonic Specters and the Object Hereafter by Kristen Gallerneaux was published, January 2019.

As I said in my review, "Because of its historical, curatorial, and cultural curiosity, High Static, Dead Lines: Sonic Specters and the Object Hereafter, is an interesting and insightful read for media historians, parapsychologists, sound artists, and anyone interested in technological materiality. Those of you experienced with hauntings may enjoy Gallerneaux's personal experiences as well."

Response from the author . . .
I just wanted to extend a quick "thank you" for your review of High Static, Dead Lines in Leonardo Reviews. I was really happy to discover it while attempting the post-holiday wake up before heading back to the office this morning.
Kristen Gallerneaux
2 January 2019

2018 News

Brautigan Library Featured on This American Life

Interview. Invited. (29 Dec. 2018)
Transcript
My research project, The Brautigan Library, was featured in "Act Two: Book Fishing in America" as part of episode #664, "The Room of Requirement," of This American Life, a weekly public radio program heard by 2.2 million listeners on over 500 public radio stations in the U.S., with another 2.5 million people downloading each episode as a podcast.

The This American Life website describes "Act Two: Book Fishing" in America like this.
In Richard Brautigan's novel "The Abortion," he imagines a library where regular people can come and drop off their own unpublished books. Nothing is turned away. The books live there forever. It's the kind of place that would never work in real life. But someone decided to try it. Producer Sean Cole has the story. (28 minutes)

As a featured guest, I talked about my work as "The Librarian" for The Brautigan Library, a curated collection of more than 300 unpublished manuscripts by international authors inspired by a fictional library described by Richard Brautigan in his novel, The Abortion: An Historical Romance 1966, published in 1971. Producer Sean Cole interviewed founder Todd Lockwood and myself to tell the story of The Brautigan Library in Act Two of the episode: Book Fishing in America. Listen.

What I wrote that made Brautigan haunt me.

Brautigan's fictional library was turned into reality by Lockwood in Burlington, Vermont, in 1990. In 2010, I negotiated the move of the library to Vancouver, Washington, where it is currently housed in the Clark County Historical Museum.

The Brautigan Library is an offshoot of my research and scholarship associated with Richard Brautigan, the Washington-born author said to best capture the zeitgeist of the counterculture movement during the late 1960s-early 1970s. My scholarship, available at the American Dust: The Life and Works of Richard Brautigan website, is internationally regarded as the most comprehensive resource regarding Brautigan, his life and works.

"Act Two: Book Fishing in America" is archived at This American Life website. The full episode, "The Room of Requirement," is archived there. You can LISTEN and/or DOWNLOAD.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented A Radio Christmas Carol

Radio art performance. (20 Dec. 2018)
Two hundred seventy people attended a live performance of the radio drama A Radio Christmas, 20 December 2018, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre, Metropolitan Performing Arts and KXRW-FM, investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Sound Spheres Exhibited at Interactive Digital Storytelling Conference

Sound Art. International. Juried. (5-8 Dec. 2018)
My sound art project, Sound Spheres, created with Greg Philbrook, was included in the 2018 International Conference for Interactive Digital Storytelling (ICIDS) Art Exhibition, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, 5-8 December 2018. Sound Spheres is a web-based installation that combines computational digital media and storytelling techne to explore an interface through which participants can create interactive, participatory sound-based narratives. LEARN more.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Dec. 2018)
My review of Privacy's Blueprint: The Battle to Control the Design of New Technologies by Woodrow Hartzog was published, December 2018.

As I said in my review, "Hartzog's blueprint for privacy is bold, insightful, innovative, passionate, and important. Privacy within a context of online interconnectedness is complicated, and not without effort. For these reasons it is easy to set aside, even ignore. Privacy's Blueprint: The Battle to Control the Design of New Technologies defines the stakes, provides numerous examples, and suggests a multi-layered structure that will make technology worthy of our trust."

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (4 Dec. 2018)
My review of Now that the audience is assembled by David Grubbs was published, 4 December 2018.

As I said in my review, "Now that the audience is assembled is an interesting and compelling exploration of the boundaries between literature and improvised music, of waiting for the work to age, and between various and different media presentations of its content. Working with other musicians and multimedia designers, Grubbs has realized his latest book as readings, public discussions, collaborative sound installations and recordings, exhibitions, wall drawings, and live performances."

Essay Published in Collection from Arabic E-lit Conference

Publication. International. Peer reviewed. (2 Dec. 2018)
My essay, Sound at the Heart of Electronic Literature was one of six published in Essays from the Arabic E-Lit Conference. This essay evolved from my presentation at the Arabic Electronic Literature international conference, Dubai, UAE, Feb. 2018. This essay argues that sound—especially that of the storyteller's voice, but including environmental and mechanical sounds as well—suggests a way of approaching and considering Arabic electronic literature. Based on the rich and deep oral histories of Arab cultures, sound provides a way of knowing and being in a literary world, real or imagined. Sound makes us re-think our relational experiences with others, with ourselves, and the spaces and places we inhabit. These shifting relationships promote interesting opportunities for Arabic and other forms of electronic literature.

Press
John F. Barber's essay "Sound at the Heart of Electronic Literature" is grounded in the specificity of Arab storytelling, much of which has historically been oral and based on the author and "reader's" interaction with sound. Thus, Barber explores sound as the throughway to approaching, understanding, and engaging with Arabic e-literature. He examines two Western e-lit works (34 North 118 West and Under Language) as well as three e-lit works from Arabic artist Mohamed Habibi in order to develop his argument, meanwhile ambitiously expanding e-lit as a "vehicle for exchanges in and across media, languages, and cultures."
— Lai-Tze Fan, ebr monthly notice, 3 Dec. 2018

Essay Published in Chercher le texte: ELO 2013 Proceedings

Publication. International. Peer reviewed. (30 Nov. 2018)
My essay, Sound and Electronic Literature: Locating the Text in the Act of Listening was published by the Electronic Literature Organization as part of Chercher le texte: ELO 2013 Proceedings. This essay evolved from my presentation at the 2013 Electronic Literature Organization international conference, Paris, France, 24-27 September 2013. An expanded version of my presentation was first published as Internet radio and electronic literature: locating the text in the act of listening by electronic book review, May 2014. In that essay, I positioned Internet radio and social audio networks as change agents for electronic literature. This present essay carries forward the core elements of my original presentation, but sets aside the expanded discussion of Internet radio and social audio networks included in the original ebr publication, focusing instead on the central nature of sound(s) to literature and literary endeavors, and thus by extension, to electronic literature.

Dogs Bark Far Away Included in Sounding Nature Project

Sound Art. International. Invited. (26 Nov. 2018)
My archival website
My sound art project, Dogs Bark Far Away, was included in Sounding Nature, a project of Cities and Memories, Oxford, England, to reimagine the sounds of nature. 250 artists, from 55 countries, reimagined almost 500 sounds. My work, Dogs Bark Far Away samples a recording by Noé Mignard of dogs barking in a forest in the Rhone-Alpes region of southern France. LEARN more.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented The D.B. Cooper Transmissions

Radio art performance. (21 Nov. 2018)
Two hundred ninety eight people attended a live performance of the radio drama Skyjacker '71: The D.B. Cooper Transmissions, 21 November 2018, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre, Metropolitan Performing Arts and KXRW-FM, investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Hipoglote 100 Broadcast during 100th Episode

Radio art. International. Invited. (9 Nov. 2018)
My archival website
My invited radio art work, Hipoglote 100 was included in the 100th episode of Hipoglote: Between the voice and the word, a sound poetry program produced by Tiago Schwäbl with Nuno Miguel Neves. Hipoglote is broadcast on Rádio Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal. LEARN more.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Nov. 2018)
My review of Introduction to Graphic Design: A Guide to Thinking, Process, and Style by Aaris Sherin was published, November 2018.

As I said in my review, "Introduction to Graphic Design: A Guide to Thinking, Process, and Style encourages readers (learners) to use critical thinking and visual exploration to understand the relationship between graphic designers and creative problem solving. The case studies, exercises, key terms and concepts, and do's and don'ts provide comfort and confidence to give visual form to concepts and ideas."

Re-Imagined Radio Presented The War of the Worlds

Radio art performance. (30 Oct. 2018)
Three hundred thirty six people attended a live re-creation of the radio drama The War of the Worlds, 30 October 2018, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre, Metropolitan Performing Arts and KXRW-FM, investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Rainstorm Reveries Broadcast on Framework Radio

Radio art broadcast. International. Juried. (Oct. 2018)
My archival website
My radio art, Rainstorm Reveries, was broadcast on framework radio.net as episode #658, 21-27 October 2018. Rainstorm Reveries explores liminal listening associated with rainstorms. The liminal threshold is sound(s) of two worlds, the external, physical world of the rainstorm, and the inner, more subjective world of sub-conscious reveries in response to the soundscape(s) heard. Featuring juried work by international sound artists, Framework Radio presents not only the extremely diverse sound environments of our world, but also the extremely diverse work produced by the artists who choose to use these environments as their sonic sources.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Oct. 2018)
My review of Success through Failure: The Paradox of Design by Henry Petroski was published, October 2018.

As I said in my review, "No single book can hope to address everything about everything, says Petroski. But, the lessons offered by Success through Failure: The Paradox of Design are straightforward: success breeds hubris and catastrophe, failure prompts humility and insight."

Re-Imagined Radio Presented Dracula

Performance. (26 Sep. 2018)
One hundred seventy two people attended a live re-creation of the radio drama Dracula, 26 September 2018, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre, Metropolitan Performing Arts and KXRW-FM, investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Sep. 2018)
My review of Totally Random by Tanya Bub and Jeffrey Bub was published, September 2018.

As I said in my review, "A serious graphic novel about a difficult subject (quantum mechanics) may not appeal to every reader. But for those who want to know more about entanglement, Totally Random provides an excellent introduction to quantum mechanics, better perhaps than a massive textbook, certainly more interesting."

Presentation at ELO 2018

Presentation. International. Peer reviewed. (Aug. 2018)
I delivered a presentation, "Mind the Gap: Video Poetry by Mohamed Habibi," at the Electronic Literature Organization 2018 international conference, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Canada, 14 August 2018. Following the conference theme, "Mind the Gap," I suggested the video poetry of Mohammed Habibi, a Saudi Arabian poet and scholar, could provide knowledge of and experience with electronic literature representing Arab creators and consumers. Specifically, I argued that sound was an essential component of Habibi's works, more so than the images presented. Habibi's sound-based video poetry demonstrates how sound connects and surrounds us with multiple, concurrent narratives. The result is a deeper, richer literary experience, prompted largely by the active engagement of our imaginations to express another sense or esoteric meaning, beyond visualization, regarding the work.

Update

My presentation was expanded and published as "Listening to Electronic Literature: Sounds at the heart of works by Jeremy Hight, Stuart Moulthrop, and Mohamed Habibi." LEARN more.

Essay Published in MATLIT

Publication. International. Peer reviewed. (Aug. 2018)
My essay, Remembering the Dead: Electronic Literature as Meme and Memorial, was published in MATLIT (Materialities of Literature), vol. 6, no. 2, 2018. This essay discusses a multimedia memorial of my design, Remembering the Dead, that recalls victims of gun homicide in the United States. This elegiac work may be considered a diversity for electronic literature, specifically one focused on social justice. Its multimedia approach speaks to themes of affiliations, communities, translations, and social justice. The work is described as finding footing in each. By remembering those killed as collateral damage in struggles between communities of belief and practice, we recall and reinforce their humanity. Additionally, we gain a broader engagement with community formation, development, and interaction, as well as an increased critical network awareness of how electronic literature might provide bridges between these communities. Remembering the Dead provides a meme regarding how to move forward with these ideas in an increasingly fractured world. This essay expands on a presentation I delivered at the Electronic Literature Organization 2017 international conference, in Porto, Portugal, 20 July 2017. MATLIT is an open access, peer-reviewed, online journal published by Coimbra University Press and the Centre for Portuguese Literature at the University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal. The journal addresses the material and technological mediations of literary practices, with a particular focus on printness, digitality, aurality, and intermediality.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Aug. 2018)
My review of Designed for Hi-Fi Living: The Vinyl LP in Midcentury America by Janet Borgerson and Jonathan Schroeder was published, August 2018.

As I said in my review, "A major theme throughout Designed for Hi-Fi Living is that record albums, perhaps seen primarily as popular, even mundane, artifacts of mass culture in postwar America, were, in fact, designed to teach American consumers how to form and reinforce family bonds, how to entertain at home, and how to travel away from home. Seen through this lens, midcentury record albums were cultural windows, each providing an essential information distribution format."

Brautigan Website Updated

Website. International. (Aug. 2018)
I updated my Brautigan Bibliography & Archive website 2 August 2018 with a new design and interface. New content about Richard Brautigan's life and writings was added. The name was changed to American Dust to better represent the mission and purpose as comprehensive information source and homage to American writer Brautigan (1935-1984). I first developed this website in 2005, and have maintained it ever since. It has been often acknowledged as the premier online resource for information about Brautigan.

Radio Art Broadcast in Barcelona, Spain

Radio art. International. Juried. (2018)
My archival website
My radio art work, Beginning-Middle-End, was broadcast by Ràdio Gràcia FM Barcelona, 14 June 2018 as part of Microtopíes 2018, an annual, special edition of Música i Geografica, a weekly radio art program curated by Gràcia Territori Sonor, who organizes activities around the experimental music of Barcelona, Spain, including the LEM Festival. Microtopíes 2018 was the seventh world collection of sound miniatures collected yearly by Gràcia Territori Sonor. Seventy five submissions, each one minute in length, were accepted from sound artists in fifteen different countries with each work contributing to the sonic mosaic of the broadcast in the order in which it was accepted.

Presentations at DHSI Colloquium

Presentation. International. Peer reviewed. (June 2018)
I delivered two presentations at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute Colloquium, University of Victoria, Canada, June 2018. The first, 6 June, was "Experiencing Sounds: Soundscapes, Soundwalks, Sound Maps, Transects," and connected to my Sounds and Digital Storytelling course offered the first week. This presentation discussed my creative practice of using transects to combine features of soundscapes, sound walks, and sound maps in order to realistically experience a place or space through listening. The second presentation, 12 June, was "Doing DH with Graphic Narratives," and connected to my Digital Storytelling course offered the second week. This presentation positioned graphic narratives as an accessible and vernacular literary medium featuring juxtaposed text and images, or images alone, well-suited to pursue minority and gender representation and expression and ethnoracial conflicts across a broad range of genres.

Zambezi River Bridge Included in CD Compilation

Radio art. International. Peer reviewed. (2018)
Event website
My archival website
My radio art, Zambezi Radio Bridge was included in A Radio Bridge across the Zambezi, to be sold on the popular online sound sharing platform, BandCamp. All proceeds from the compilation's online sales will benefit Zongwe FM, a community radio station in Sinazongwe, Zambia, and the women of Zubo Trust across the Zambezi River in Binga, Zimbabwe. The CD compilation includes twenty-three tracks, by more than fifty contributors from seventeen countries. Through an international open call, potential contributors were invited to use provided sound files taken from interviews and broadcasts by the women radio-makers of Zongwe FM to create new works of radio art. Submissions were jury selected by the women working with Zongwe FM. LEARN more.

Radio Art Essay Included in Art, Medium, Media

Essay. International. Peer reviewed. (2018)
My essay, "L'art Radiophonique: Histoire d'un Médium de Masse Devenu Médium Artistique" was collected and published in Art, Médium, Média, a new volume published by L'Harmattan, Paris, France. This essay outlines the history and provides several examples of radio art to demonstrate the use of radio beyond its traditional role of commerce and/or control. Instead, using the affordances, infrastructure, and technologies of radio, radio art seeks to produce creative artifacts within the radio medium that both depend upon the medium for their creation, communication, and consumption and engage the listening audience with new artistic practices.

This essay was first reprinted in French translation in Appareil, Vol. 18, in September 2017 [DOI:10.4000/appareil.2362]. Appareil explored "Art and medium: media in art" in two separate issues. My essay was translated into French and published as part of the second volume.

This essay was first published in English as "Radio Art: A (mass) Medium Becomes An (artistic) Medium" in the Spring 2017 issue of Hyperrhiz: New Media Cultures [https://doi.org/10.20415/hyp/017]. Hyperrhiz is a peer-reviewed online journal specializing in electronic literature, new media criticism and net art. Hyperrhiz 17: Next Horizons features works from the Electronic Literature Organization 2016 Conference and Media Arts Festival, held in Victoria, Canada, 10-12 June 2016.

Ecoustics Exhibited during Ecoacoustics Congress

Sound art. International. Juried. (2018)
Event website
My archival website
My sound art, Ecoustics, was jury selected for the Creative and Interdisciplinary Program associated with the Ecoacoustics Congress international conference, Brisbane, Australia, 24-28 June 2018. The Ecoacoustics Congress is a four day conference organised by the International Society of Ecoacoustics (ISE). Ecoacoustics is an interdisciplinary science operating in all types of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. It aims to extend the scope of acoustics and bioacoustics and investigate natural and anthropogenic sounds and their relationship with the environment over a wide range of study scales, both spatial and temporal, including populations, communities, and landscapes. My work, Ecoustics, explores how anthropogenic sounds may overpower natural sounds, but not displace them. The aim of the 2018 Ecoacoustics Congress is to bring together scientists, natural resource managers, industry, and artists to explore the ways that sound deepens our understanding of the environment. The conference is supported by Queensland University of Technology, Griffith University, International Society of Ecoacoustics, and World Forum for Acoustic Ecology. LEARN more.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International. (Mar. 2018)
My review of Blood, Sweat, and Pixels: The Triumphant, Turbulent Stories Behind How Video Games Are Made by Jason Schreirer, March 2018

As I said in my review, "Blood, Sweat, and Pixels is a tribute to the dedicated people who overcome obstacles greater than those they include in the best video games imaginable in order to provide the rest of us with game play experiences that are immersive, believable, and rewarding."

Essay Republished in Digital Studies

Publication. International. Peer Reviewed. (Feb. 2018)
Publication website (thematic issue)
Publication website (individual essay)
My essay, "Radio Nouspace: Sound, Radio, Digital Humanities" [DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/dscn.275], was republished as part of a thematic collection by Digital Studies/Le champ numérique, 28 February 2018. One of four included in this collection, each selected from presentations during the Digital Humanities Summer Institute 2015 Colloquium, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, 9-13 June 2015, my essay describes my Radio Nouspace project as a site for creative Digital Humanities research, scholarship, and presentation. A particular endeavor is curation by re-creation of vintage radio dramas before live audiences in order to prompt listeners to consider the ability of sounds to convey appreciation, emotion, experience, information, and meaning(s). This essay was first published October 2017 in Digital Studies/Le champ numérique, available here.

Introducing Saudi scholar and video poet Mohamed Habibi

Video poetry. (Feb. 2018)
YouTube channel
I met Mohamed Habibi as a participant in the day-long workshop, Hacking Electronic Literature, I presented with Dene Grigar and Rehan Hosny at Rochester Institute of Technology, Dubai, UAE, 25 February 2018. This workshop, focused on creating different forms of electronic literature, was the first of its kind ever offered in the Arab world. My focus was sound-based electronic literature. Habibi shared his video poetry with me after the workshop, and again during the following three day international conference, Arabic Electronic Literature: New Horizons and Global Perspectives. I was much impressed with his evocative use of sound to convey his visual poetry. He gave me permission to share his work through my website. See, and hear, more at Mohamed Habibi's YouTube channel.

Just Words

Matchbox

Mug

There and Back Exhibited during Arabic eLit 2018

Sound art. International. Invited. (Feb. 2018)
Event website
My archival website
My sound art, There and Back: A Sound-based Electronic Literature Journey, was one of seven original works of electronic literature invited for a curated exhibition during the Arabic Electronic Literature: New Horizons and Global Perspectives international conference, the first ever focusing on electronic literature in the Arab region. The conference and exhibition, called Elektroniya, was held at Rochester Institute of Technology Dubai, Dubai, UAE, 25-27 February 2018. LEARN more.

Presentation and Workshop at Arabic Electronic Literature Conference

Presentation. International. Invited. (Feb. 2018)
I delivered a presentation, "Sound and Electronic Literature," at the Arabic Electronic Literature international conference, Rochester Institute of Technology, Dubai, United Arab Emirates, 25-27 February 2018. My presentation asked how new media, as a technology and a system for communicating in new ways, prompts us to consider sound-based narratives as a new form of electronic literature. One suggestion is that sound-based stories, and listening, prompts us to reconsider the spaces and places we inhabit, and the stories we might tell about our experiences. Additionally, I led, with Rahem Hosny and Dene Grigar, a full day workshop, Hacking Electronic Literature, focused on creating electronic literature, the first of its kind workshop in the Arab world.

Update

My presentation was expanded and published as Sound at the Heart of Electronic Literature, one of six essays included in the gathering Essays from the Arabic E-lit Conference by electronic book review, 2 Dec. 2018. LEARN more.

Review Published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. International (Feb. 2018)
My review of I Got A Song: A History of the Newport Folk Festival by Rick Massimo was published, February 2018.

As I said in my review, "Folk music has evolved over decades, absorbing influences from many different musical sources. And folk music has been at the center of changes in American life. Massimo argues convincingly that the Newport Folk Festival provided a center for many of these changes throughout its history. I Got a Song tells the stories, big and small, of those musicians and fans, who, for generations, have come to Newport to sing folk songs, and who, looking back, have helped define and shape an identity and culture that survives even these current, fractured times."

Internet Galaxy Selected for Digital Album

Sound art. International. Juried. (Jan. 2018)
Event website
My archival website
My sound art, Internet Galaxy, was included in a digital album entitled Soundmaps for Dreamers II released by Sonospace, 24 January. The thirty-seven works included in this compilation were selected from Sound Maps for Dreamers II, an exhibition curated by Harry Sumner for Sonospace, a sound archive and audio publisher founded in London focused on the research and documentation of field recording and sound art. LEARN more.

Presentation at INKE 2018

Publication. International. Peer Reviewed. (Jan. 2018)
Event website
I delivered a presentation, "Digital Storytelling and the Future(s) of Multimedia Scholarship," at the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) 2018 international conference, Victoria, Canada, 10 January 2018. Following the conference theme, "Beyond Open: Implementing Social Scholarship," I suggested distributing scholarly communication through multiple, open, and accessible media channels could prove useful in reaching a broader audience, especially if the content of the message is pitched to the audience of the particular media channel. Additionally, I outlined six guiding principles for sharing scholarly communications.

Update

This presentation was expanded and published as "Digital Storytelling and Open, Networked Social Scholarship: A Narrative" in KULA: Knowledge Creation, Dissemination, and Preservation Studies (vol. 3, no. 1, 27 Feb. 2019, p. 17. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/kula.37) as part of special collection of INKE conference proceedings, Beyond Open: Implementing Social Scholarship. KULA is a peer-reviewed, open access journal, meant to encourage the formation of a multi-disciplinary community of scholars studying human knowledge processes through the ages, concerned to understand their role in the full sweep of human civilizations, and to project them into the future from both humanistic and technological perspectives. LEARN more.

In Progress Broadcast on Framework Radio

Radio art broadcast. International. Juried. (Dec. 2017-Jan. 2018)
My archival website
My radio art, In Progress, was broadcast on framework radio.net as episode #623, 17 December 2017-13 January 2018. In Progress is a radio art narrative with a rhythm, even melody, composed mostly of field recorded mechanical sounds. The work is inspired by John Cage, who told us that everywhere we listen, there is always something to be heard, sound(s) around us, always, speaking to events in progress. The narrative intent is to portray life and projects in the process of always becoming, in progress. Featuring juried work by international sound artists, Framework Radio presents not only the extremely diverse sound environments of our world, but also the extremely diverse work produced by the artists who choose to use these environments as their sonic sources.

2017 News

Music from Space . . . View from Hill Included in Compilation

Sound art. International. Juried. (2017)
Event website
My archival website
My sound art, Music Heard from Space while Admiring a View from a Hill, was jury selected for a CD compilation, View from a Hill, released 24 December 2017 by Linear Obsessional Recordings, London, England. A total of 105 works were selected from an international call. Each work was to be exactly two minutes in length, but might include music, spoken word, and/or field recordings. My work includes sounds of wind in Oklahoma prairie tall grass, geese flying overhead, and electromagnetic radiation recorded by NASA Voyager spacecraft.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented A Radio Christmas Carol

Art performance. (Dec. 2017)
Three hundred twenty people attended a live re-creation of the radio drama A Radio Christmas Carol, by Metropolitan Performing Arts, 20 December 2017, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre and Metropolitan Performing Arts investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Internet Galaxy Selected for Online Exhibition

Sound art. Juried. (2017)
Event website
My archival website
My sound art, Internet Galaxy, was jury selected for Sound Maps for Dreamers II, an exhibition curated by Harry Sumner for Sonospace. International artists were invited to link audio recordings and compositions based on field recordings to small, non-related historic paper maps, with a clear and specific target area. The conceptual framework of this project is to make the imagined real through sound. Sonospace is a sound archive and audio publisher founded in London focused on the research and documentation of field recording and sound art.

Review published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. (2017)
My review of Gallery Sound by Caleb Kelly was published, December 2017.

Brautigan Library Project Noted in Atlas Obscura

Interview. Peer Invited. (2017)
Event website
My archival website
My curatorial project, The Brautigan Library, was mentioned in Atlas Obscura as part of a story asking about the oldest item held in thirteen of "the world's wondrously specific libraries." My answer was that the oldest manuscript would be the first submitted in 1990, when The Brautigan Library opened. Other libraries had perhaps more interesting, and certainly older items in their collection, but arguably none more personal than the manuscripts submitted by their authors to this unique collection of unpublished manuscripts.

Sound Art Exhibited During Helicotrema 2017

Sound art. Juried. (2017)
Event website
My archival website
My sound art, Imaginative Radio Plays, was jury selected for a curated exhibition in Palazzo Grassi and in other venues as part of Helicotrema Festival 2017, Venice, Italy, during the closing week of the world renowned Venice Art Biennale, 20-24 November. Helicotrema is an annual festival that presents a program of recorded audio pieces aimed at investigating different forms of site-specific collective listening situations, inspired by the early decades of radio broadcasts, and how the listening experience can be enriched and adapted to different contexts. From one hundred submissions, only seven works, including mine, were selected for this year's program. Helicotrema Festival 2017 is curated by Blauer Hase and Giulia Morucchio. LEARN more.

Fellowship at Scholarly Communications Institute

Fellowship. Peer reviewed. (2017)
Event website
I worked with five other international and interdisciplinary scholar-teachers to investigate "Digital Storytelling and the Future(s) of Multimedia Scholarship" during the Triangle Scholarly Communication Institute (SCI), The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 5-9 November 2017. Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, SCI is an annual, week-long partnership between Duke University, North Carolina Central University, North Carolina State University, The University of North Carolina, the Triangle Research Libraries Network, the National Humanities Center, and the American Council of Learned Societies. My group's proposal was one of six selected through peer review from thirty submitted.

SCI convenes scholars, information scientists, librarians, publishers, technologists, and others from both inside and outside academia to articulate and address needs and opportunities in the domain of scholarly communications. The theme for 2017 was "Scholarly Storytelling: Compelling Research for an Engaged Public." LEARN more.

My group brought a diverse array of practices and platforms, including podcasting, live stream broadcasting, digital games, social media, and e-literature to bear on the question of how to reframe scholarship and pedagogical practices as public-first information sharing, rather than the traditional model of dissemination after-the-fact (if at all). Our final presentation, representing four days of intense consideration, argued that distribution of scholarly communication through multiple digital media channels could prove more useful in reaching a broader audience, especially if, in each case, the content of our message is pitched to the audience of the particular media channels. My colleagues were: Dene Grigar (Washington State University Vancouver), Hannah McGregor (Simon Fraser University), Jon Saklofske (Acadia University), Bonnie Stewart (University of Prince Edward Island), and Alyssa Arbuckle (University of Victoria).

Remembering the Dead Exhibited at iDEAS 2017

Multimedia art. Juried. (Oct. 2017)
My archival website
My multimedia art work, "Remembering the Dead," was exhibited during the iDEAS 2017 Exhibition, held in conjunction with the International Digital Media and Arts Association (iDMAa) conference, 6-7 October 2017, at the University of The District of Columbia, Washington, D.C. "Remembering the Dead" is a multimedia art installation that memorializes victims of gun homicides by displaying and speaking their names, and fit well with the exhibition and conference theme: Art and Inclusivity in the Digital Age. LEARN more.

Essay Published in Digital Studies

Essay. Peer reviewed (Oct. 2017)
My essay, "Radio Nouspace: Sound, Radio, Digital Humanities," expanded from a presentation during the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI), University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, 7-12 June 2015, was published in Digital Studies/Le champ numérique. My essay placed sound as vocalization of abstract thought at the basis of literature, writing, speaking, and language. I argued that highlighting sound as the basis for narrative and storytelling that is participatory, interactive, and experiential is a worthy goal for digital humanities.

Update

This essay was republished by Digital Studies/Le champ numérique as part of thematic collection February 2018. LEARN more.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented Laugh Your Dial Off

Community service. (Sep. 2017)
Skits from Old Time Radio comedians, including Jack Benny, Fibber McGee and Molly, Abbot and Costello, Charlie McCarthy and Edgar Bergenand, and W.C. Fields by Willamette Radio Workshop, Wednesday, 27 September 2017, at the historic Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre and Willamette Radio Workshop investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Beyond Grammatron Symposium & Exhibition

Service. International. Volunteer. (Sep. 2017)
Event website
Grammatron archival website; another archival website
I provided planning, logistical, and technical support for the Beyond Grammatron Symposium & Exposition, hosted at British Computer Society, 14-15 September 2017, London, England. "Beyond Grammatron: 20 Years into the Future" celebrated the 20-year anniversary of Grammatron, the groundbreaking work of net art by Mark Amerika, with a symposium and exhibition featuring presentations and panels about the convergence of net art and electronic literature as well as the curation and archiving of historical works of digital art.

Interviewed by Scripps

Interview. National. Invited. (2017)
Archival website
I was interviewed by Kamasi Aaron, National Correspondent, The E.W. Scripps Company, about my work with The Brautigan Library. The profile piece was broadcast by twelve of the thirty three Scripps-owned television stations around the country, Tampa Bay, FL (WFTS), South Florida (WPTV), Detroit, MI (WXYZ), Cleveland, OH (WEWS), Cincinnati, OH (WCPO), Kansas City, KS (KSHB), Denver, CO (KMGH), San Diego, CA (KGTV), Arizona (KNXV), Milwaukee, WI (WTMJ), Wisconson (WGBA), and Buffalo, NY (WKBW). I talked about the history of The Brautigan Library, its work here in Vancouver, Washington, and several of the interesting manuscripts in the Library's collection. The Brautigan Library is a collection of over three hundred unpublished manuscripts, all submitted by authors with little or no opportunity to see their works commercially published. Each manuscript has its own, unique story to share. The E. W. Scripps Company is an American broadcasting company founded in 1878 as a chain of daily newspapers by Edward Willis "E. W." Scripps. Today, Scripps operates television and radio stations around the country, and the national spelling bee competition.

Presentations at ELO 2017

Presentations. International. Peer reviewed. (July 2017)
Event website
Abstracts with Festival and Exhibits Catalog download
My archival website
I delivered two presentations at the 2017 international conference of the Electronic Literature Organization, at the University Fernando Pessoa, Porto, Portugal, 20 July 2017. The first was "Remembering the Dead: Electronic Literature as Memorial and Meme." I described my project, Remembering the Dead, that seeks to remember victims of gun homicide in the United States, saying this elegiac work may be considered a diversity for electronic literature, specifically one focused on social justice. By remembering those killed we recall and reinforce their humanity. Additionally, we gain a broader engagement with community formation, development, and interaction, as well as an increased critical network awareness of how electronic literature might provide bridges between these communities. Remembering the Dead provides a meme regarding how to move forward with these ideas in an increasingly fractured world. LEARN more.

The second presentation was "Test Pattern for Listening: Sound Poetry as Electronic Literature," in which I explored the materiality of sound poetry by considering recombination and remixing as technologies for conceptualizing and communicating abstract thought, together with non-vocal sound(s), which provide, through performance, expressive and material practices that re/trans-mix/create/code perspectives on electronic literature.

Update

My presentation "Remembering the Dead: Electronic Literature as Memorial and Meme" was expanded and published in MATLIT (Materialities of Literature), vol. 6, no. 2, 2018. LEARN more.

My presentation, "Test Pattern for Listening: Sound Poetry as Electronic Literature," was expanded and published in Hyperrhiz: New Media Cultures, no. 19, Winter 2019. LEARN more.

Sound Art, 11'22", Exhibited During FILE 2017

Sound art. Juried. (July-Sep. 2017)
Event website
My archival website
My sound art work, 11'22," was one of seventeen by international artists jury selected for exhibition as part of the Hypersonica Program during FILE 2017, the Electronic Language International Festival, 18 July-3 September 2017, in Sao Paulo, Brazil. 11'22" is a sound landscape / poem / art work created using audio samples from 2014 and 2015 conferences on electronic literature, language, and literacy. 11'22" traverses these genres of electronic sonority, suggesting comprehension through the act of listening. The work's title comes from its length, eleven minutes and twenty-two seconds. LEARN MORE.

Radio Art Broadcast in Barcelona, Spain

Radio art. Juried. (July 2017)
My archival website
My radio art work, PSA: Interrupted Suspense, was broadcast by Ràdio Gràcia FM Barcelona, 8 July 2017 as part of Microtopíes 2017, an annual, special edition of Música i Geografica, a weekly radio art program curated by Gràcia Territori Sonor, who organizes activities around the experimental music of Barcelona, Spain, including the LEM Festival. Microtopíes 2017 was the sixth world collection of sound miniatures collected yearly by Gràcia Territori Sonor. Fifty nine submissions, each one minute in length, were accepted from eleven different countries with each work contributing to the sonic mosaic of the broadcast in the order in which it was accepted. LEARN more.

Radio Nouspace Models Academic Book of the Future

Scholarship. International. Peer reviewed. (2017)
My practice-based research project Radio Nouspace was featured in a report, "Scholarly Equivalents of the Monograph? An Examination of some Digital Edge Cases" (download .PDF here) by James O'Sullivan, University of Sheffield, as part of the Academic Book of the Future (ABOF) project presented to the Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and The British Library.

The Academic Book of the Future was a two-year AHRC-funded research project exploring the future of the academic book. O'Sullivan's report was original research commissioned by the project. The two final project outputs include The Academic Book and the Future Project Report: A Report to the AHRC and the British Library, London (Marilyn Deegan 2017; download .PDF here) and Academic Books and their Futures: A Report to the AHRC and the British Library, London (Michael Jubb 2017; download .PDF here). All reports from the ABOF project are available here. See also Edge Cases As Academic Possibility by James O'Sullivan (talking humanities, 13 Nov. 2018).

O'Sullivan says the book remains the most valuable currency of the Humanities discipline, "and whether we might consider something to be bookish has profound professional repercussions for the future of our field." He examines "projects which look to collate, curate, and create thematically consistent critical insights on topics of relevance to the Arts and Humanities, using unfamiliar forms," calling them "edge cases."

He says edge cases provide "valuable scholarship . . . appearing in the shape of digital resources, curated spaces, participatory and community-based projects, visual representations, and a multiplicity of other arrangements that are clearly scholarly, but not immediately distinguishable as academic books."

Specifically, "Radio Nouspace is an interesting edge case in that it demonstrates two things: it shows how text can be subverted through digital publishing, and it represents the distinction between "a blog" or Web-based portfolio, and a consistent collection of valuable scholarship that replicates what we consider a monograph. It is a collection of materials on a consistent theme, containing all of the information and representing the scholarly rigour that one would expect of an academic book. The digital holds the potential to re-construct the book as laboratory, wherein initiatives like Radio Nouspace provide a space for scholars, in individual and collective capacities, to undertake practice-based research and creative meaning-making."

Radio Nouspace is a repository and laboratory for research, scholarship, and creative practices regarding radio, sound, and listening as closely connected with communication, creative endeavor, literacy, and social justice.

Radio Nouspace, O'Sullivan concludes, avails "of the affordances of computation in order to create academic resources that might be considered equivalent to more established forms. The content of Radio Nouspace would easily fill the page space of a standard-length monograph, but such content is unsuited to the page, and so it has had to be articulated through the screen. [Radio Nouspace is] not scholarly because [it is] representative of trends which happen to be en vogue, but because [it demonstrates] the intellectual, curatorial, and communicative rigour that should be expected of any academic undertaking."

"The privilege of print is that we assume its content possesses such rigour by default, when the reality is that there are many examples of careless writing and trivial research being legitimised by questionable publications and reviewing processes. The role of Arts and Humanities scholars is to create and share knowledge and meaning that is of value to their students, communities, and indeed, the general populace—the tools which scholars use to generate, frame, and disseminate their work should not distract from the quality of that which is being shared. [Radio Nouspace is a] compelling example of how edge cases, while not mimicking the academic book, are equivalent in terms of the scholarship entailed."

Presentations at DHSI Colloquium

Presentation. International. Peer reviewed. (June 2017)
Schedule here
I delivered two presentations at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute Colloquium, University of Victoria, Canada, 13 June 2017. The first was "Maker and Made: Uneasy Relationship with our Created Artifacts," and connected to my Digital Storytelling course offered this week. I suggested that artifacts like music, drama, literature, and buildings all are stories about human endeavors. As we create artifacts in our likeness, however, we grow uncomfortable. For example, robots evoke both desire and fear. We desire to extend our abilities, but fear being superseded by our creations. A solution may be to build artifacts that incorporate human curiosity, and human interest to seek answers regarding the meaning of being human.

The second presentation was "Sounds and DH: An Uncurated Installation," and connected to my Sounds & DH course offered this week. I suggested that sound prompts narrative, that we strive to integrate sounds into the ongoing stories we tell ourselves about our lives and actions. This installation involved multiple people creating sounds or contributing sounds to an evolving installation. How and what was unscripted. The outcome was unknown. What stories will this uncurated sound installation bring to mind?

Interviewed on American Senior Radio Network

Interview. Invited. (2017)
I was interviewed by Gerald Gaule, of American Senior Radio Network. We talked about my Re-Imagined Radio project, and future plans. The hour-long interview is available at the archival website noted above. The American Senior Radio Network is a commercial free audio service providing news, information, book-magazine-newspaper readings, nostalgia and Old Time Radio for the blind and disabled and seniors.

In Memoriam Featured in Divine Sounds Exhibition

Sound art. (May 2017)
My archival website
In Memoriam, a collaborative work of photography and sound art, was featured in the Divine Sounds exhibition, at Divine Consign furniture store, in downtown Vancouver, Washington, 5 May 2017. The exhibition, planned as part of the downtown First Friday Art Walk, was the final project for a sound installation class I taught for the Creative Media & Digital Culture program at Washington State University Vancouver. Twenty six student works were included in the one-evening-only exhibition. In Memoriam consisted of four photographs of dead beings found along the Pacific Northwest coast: a flying squirrel, a salmon, a jellyfish, and a bird. A spoken obituary was provided for each. Photographs by Dale Strouse. Voice recordings by Troy Scott. Concept and production by John Barber. LEARN more

Remembering the Dead: Northern Ireland Published

Electronic literature. (2017)
My archival website
Remembering the Dead: Northern Ireland, a work of electronic literature, was published by New Binary Press, Cork, Ireland. The work recalls the nearly 3,600 men, women, and children killed during the Troubles, a violent political conflict focused on the constitutional status of Northern Ireland, late 1960s-early 2000s. The conflict was focused primarily in Northern Ireland, but spilled over into parts of the Republic of Ireland, England, and Europe. The work was inspired by my visit to Derry, Northern Ireland, in 2016, to participate in the Irish Sound Science and Technology Association International Festival and Conference on Sound in the Arts, Science and Technology. Remembering the Dead: Northern Ireland is an iteration of Remembering the Dead which recalls victims of gun violence in America. LEARN more.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented City of Weird

Media art. (Apr. 2017)
Five short, otherworldly radio plays, adapted by Cynthia J. McGean from the anthology City of Weird (published by Forest Avenue Press, Portland, OR, 2016) were performed by Willamette Radio Workshop, Wednesday, 26 April 2017, at Kiggins Theatre, in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre and Willamette Radio Workshop investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Sound Art Included in Audiograft 2017

Sound art. Juried. (Mar. 2017)
Event website
My archival website
Two short works of sound art, Flight Control and Another Cougar First Down were jury selected for exhibition during Audiograft 2017, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, England, 7-19 March 2017. Both works were part of the "Jukebox," which showcases short sound art works in an online, on demand context. Both works were previewed at Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archeology, Oxford, England, Live Friday, 3 March 2017. Audiograft is an annual international festival of experimental music and sound, exhibitions, artists talks, and workshops, curated by the Sonic Art Research Unit (SARU), of Oxford Brookes University. LEARN more.

Sound Installation Featured in Historical Museum Exhibition

Sound installation. Invited. (Mar.-May 2017)
Event website
My archival website
My sound installation, A Mighty Span, will be included in the "Bridging the Gap: The History of the Interstate Bridge" exhibition, at the Clark County Historical Museum, 4 March-2 May 2017, Vancouver, Washington. The Historical Museum, first opened in 1917, the same year as the Interstate Bridge. LEARN more.

Interviewed for Hipoglote Radio Program

Interview. Invited. (Feb. 2017)
Event website
I was interviewed by Tiago Schwäbl with Nuno Miguel Neves for Schwäbl's program Hipoglote: Between the voice and the word, broadcast on Rádio Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal. Both Schwäbl and Neves are doctoral students at the Universidade de Coimbra. We talked about and shared examples of spoken word poetry, experimental sounds, language hacking, and radio. The interview, nearly two hours in length, was aired in two parts, Part 1, as Episode 28 on 7 February and Part 2, as Episode 29 on 14 February 2017. LEARN more at the Hipoglote Facebook page. Listen at the Mixcloud webpage.

Sound Installation Featured at Interstate Bridge Centennial Celebration

Sound installation. Invited. (2017)
Event website
My archival website
My sound installation, A Mighty Span, was featured at the Interstate Bridge 100th anniversary celebration, 11 February 2017, Jantzen Beach, Oregon. The Interstate Bridge was the first automobile bridge to connect Portland, Oregon, and Vancouver, Washington. Before, a ferry was the only way to cross the river. My sound installation imagined a radio broadcast from atop the bridge on its opening day, 14 February 1917, complete with speeches by local and state officials, thousands of people, two marching bands, and hundreds of automobiles. The invitation to create and exhibit A Mighty Span came from PDX Bridge Festival, Ten Partners, and the Oregon Historical Society. LEARN more.

Presentation at King's College London

Presentation. International. Peer reviewed. (2017)
Conference website
I presented "Broadcasting the Barricades and Beaches: BBC Listeners and Producers Learn the Power of Radio" at BBC and the World News Service: Debts & Legacies conference, King's College, London, 2-4 February 2017. I examined the 1926 BBC radio program Broadcasting from the Barricades, perhaps the earliest radio hoax, and the question of whether a voice actor impersonated Winston Churchill's radio addresses to the nation during World War II as experiments with a medium little understood by either its producers or consumers. Both examples illustrate the power of rhetoric to coalesce and motivate a listening audience, and the ability of the radio medium to broadcast that rhetorical power over distance. This looking back provides insight and courage for looking forward as we measure the debts and legacies of BBC radio.

Presentation at INKE 2017

Presentation. International. Peer reviewed. (2017)
Conference website
I presented "The Brautigan Library: Open Networked Social Scholarship?" at INKE (Implementing New Knowledge Environments), Victoria, Canada, 17 January 2017. This conference explores networked open social scholarship and creating and disseminating research and research technologies to a broad, interdisciplinary audience of specialists and non-specialists in ways that are both accessible and significant. My presentation asked whether The Brautigan Library, a collection of unpublished analogue, non-academic manuscripts speaks to inclusive, participatory, and publicly-engaged digital scholarship.

Sound Art Selected for Art In Dream Project

Sound art. Juried. (2017)
My archival website
My sound art work, Dream Cycle was one of thirty seven by artists from twenty four countries jury selected for the international Art In Dream project. Selected artists portray dream in different media. My work is an audio narrative representing dreams during the five stages of sleep and REM (Rapid Eye Movement). The purpose is to illustrate the potential for narrative embedded within dreams through an imaginary sonification of dreaming. LEARN more.

Transect: London Broadcast on Framework Radio

Radio art broadcast. International. Juried. (29 Jan.-4 Feb. 2017)
My archival website
My radio art, In Progress, was broadcast on framework radio.net as episode #583, 29 January-4 February 2017. Transect: London is part of a sound art project investigating ways of sampling sounds along a path through a particular space or place. The desired end result is to promote immersive narrative collages of sounds that represent that place or space, all best experienced through listening. Featuring juried work by international sound artists, Framework Radio presents not only the extremely diverse sound environments of our world, but also the extremely diverse work produced by the artists who choose to use these environments as their sonic sources. LEARN more.

2016 News

Re-Imagined Radio Presented A Radio Christmas Carol

Performance. (Dec. 2016)
More than three hundred people attended a live re-creation of the radio drama A Radio Christmas Carol by Willamette Radio Workshop, 21 December 2016, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. As community service, food donations were requested. Seven hundred sixty three pounds of food and $325.00 in donations were collected for The Clark County Food Bank, providing 2,228 meals for hungry families in Clark County. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre and Willamette Radio Workshop investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Remembering the Dead Exhibited in bleuOrange

Publication. Peer reviewed. (2016)
Publication website
My archival website
My multimedia art work, Remembering the Dead was exhibited as "Ses souvenir des mortes" in bleuOrange: Revue de Littérature Hypermédiatique 09 December 2016. Myriam Watthee-Delmotte, Brussels, Belgium, wrote, in her editorial, "La création hypermédiatique: des ritualités alternatives pour gérer les morts violentes," that the work evokes respect for those killed by gun violence, and that such work is necessary in our contemporary society. bleuOrange is an international journal, published in French, focused on hypermedia literature.

Remembering the Dead Exhibited in Hyperrhiz

Online exhibition. Juried. (2016)
Publication website
My archival website
Remembering the Dead was exhibited as a creative work in Hyperrhiz 15, Fall 2016. Hyperrhiz is an international peer-reviewed online journal specializing in new media criticism and electronic literature. This online exhibition comes days after the work was removed from Boomerang Gallery in Vancouver, Washington, by "The Committee," because it "was not Christmasy." See below.

Multimedia Artwork Removed by "The Committee"

Sound art. Invited. (2016)
My archival website
One day after being invited for exhibition at Boomerang, in downtown Vancouver, Washington, Remembering the Dead, was removed from its location on the first floor and placed under a basement staircase. The decision to remove the work was made by "The Committee," according to a Boomerang employee, because it "was not Christmasy."

Remembering the Dead is a multimedia artwork that memorializes victims of gun homicide in America by displaying and speaking their names. The work was invited for exhibition at Boomerang 17 November-30 December 2016.

"When invited to exhibit my work at Boomerang, I hoped it would promote community dialogue and engagement concerning ways to deal with the loss of approximately eighty human lives to gun violence every day in our nation," said John Barber, who created the work. "One of the individuals memorialized in this work was killed in downtown Vancouver, not far from Boomerang. The mass killing that prompted the work occurred in Roseburg, Oregon, close enough that we all should wonder, 'What if . . .' I am disappointed that art that makes one think, indeed, requires that one think, is hidden beneath the staircase."

The exhibition at Boomerang was to be the first local showing of Remembering the Dead, which debuted at an international festival in Derry, Northern Ireland, and was then invited for another international exhibition at the Paul Watkins Gallery, in Minnesota.

Essay Published in Scholarly and Research Communication

Essay. Peer reviewed (2016)
Publication website
My essay, "Re-Created Radio Dramas as Innovative Knowledge Environments" was published in Scholarly and Research Communication, a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary, Open Access online journal. This essay evolved from my presentation at the INKE (Implementing New Knowledge Environments) conference, 19-20 January 2016, Whistler, BC, Canada. I suggest re-creation of vintage radio dramas as live performances promotes participatory knowledge environments in which to explore both the context of original production for these dramas as well as their continued ability to communicate complex narratives to listening audiences.

Sound Art Published in 1 Minute Autohypnosis Project

Sound art. International. Peer reviewed. (2016)
Project website
My archival website
"A Train Is Arriving/Departing" was collected on CD #38 of the "1 Minute Autohypnosis" project by international sound artist Pedro Bericat, Zaragoza, Spain. The CD, released in a small edition of only sixteen copies, includes sixteen works by sound artists from Chile, China, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Italy, Norway, Portugal, Spain, United Kingdom, and United States. Distributed as mail art to the artists, with a repurposed 45rpm record envelope serving as the envelope. Picture here. A sticker on the envelope front provides the artist's name and mailing address. Another sticker notes the title of his or her work included on the CD. The enclosed CD is backed by an unrelated plastic 45rpm record. A thermal printed index of the works included is folded around the CD. "A Train Is Arriving/Departing" is part of my Sonic Miniatures project. Learn more.

Presentation at International Conference on Digital Media and Textuality

Presentation. International. Peer reviewed. (2016)
Conference website
I presented "Sound and Electronic Literature: 'Under Language' and 'Narrative Archaeology'" at the International Conference on Digital Media and Textuality, Universität Bremen, Germany, 3-5 November 2016. I described recombining / reconceptualizing sound artifacts from pioneering works of electronic literature no longer readily available to readdress the originals more effectively than through description or transcription. The proposed techne promotes new opportunities and challenges for moving forward with our conceptions and practices regarding sound based electronic literature.

Sound Art at Exhibition Shapeshifting Texts

Sound art. International. Invited. (2016)
Exhibition website
My archival website
Tunnel To Another World was exhibited in Exhibition Shapeshifting Texts: An Exhibition of Electronic and Experimental Literature, Universität Bremen, Germany, 3-5 November 2016. The exhibition, curated by Daniela Cörtes Maduro, is part of the International Conference on Digital Media and Textuality. "Tunnel To Another World" is a sonic text, narrating a journey from one world to another, parallel world, and return.

Sound Installation at You/I Exhibition

Sound art. International. Invited. (2016)
Installation website
My archival website
Remembering the Dead, a multimedia artwork that memorializes victims of gun homicide in America by displaying and speaking their names, was exhibited as part of You/I: User Interfaces & Reader Experience, Paul Watkins Gallery, Winona State University, Winona, Minnesota, 22 September-14 October 2016. Curated by Dene Grigar. Each of the nine works invited for this exhibition were selected to express the unique ways in which interfaces can impact reader experience and the relationship readers have with the stories told through them. LEARN more.

New Website Launched

Website. (2016)
A new website, launched 12 July 2016, replaces the long-running "deconstructed" and "cyberspsace" versions of John Barber's website. The new website is fully responsive HTML5 based on a template by HTML5 UP and released under a Creative Commons Attribution license. Many aspects of the design and interactivity are customized.

Sound Art Installation at ISSTA

Sound art installation. International. Peer reviewed. (2016)
Installation website
Archival website
Remembering the Dead, a multimedia artwork that memorializes victims of gun homicide in America by displaying and speaking their names, was exhibited at the international, peer-reviewed Irish Sound Science and Technology Association International Festival and Conference on Sound in the Arts, Science and Technology, Derry/Londonderry, Northern Ireland, 7-9 September 2016. This sound art installation establishes a temporary autonomous zone, defined and expressed through sound, technology and culture, in which the nearly 3,600 individuals killed during the Troubles in Northern Ireland are memorialized. In this temporary space, we seek permanence by honoring the victims, affirming their humanity, and assuring their memories will not fade from active memory. LEARN more.

Presentation at DHSI Colloquium 2

Presentation. International. Peer reviewed. (2016)
Published abstracts
"Sounds and Digital Humanities" presented at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute Colloquium, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada, 15 June 2016. I suggested that sound provides a modality of knowing and being in the world through listening. Sounds makes us re-think our relational experiences with others, with ourselves, and the spaces and places we inhabit. These relationships promote interesting opportunities for sound-based Digital Humanities scholarship and pedagogy.

Presentation at ELO 2016

Presentation. International. Peer reviewed. (2016)
I presented, with Alcina Cortez, "Sound Art As Electronic Literary Artifacts: Objects of Shifting Imaginations, Self Construction, Spaces of Memory" at the Electronic Literature Organization 2016 international conference, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada, 10-12 June 2016. Alcina used my "Sound Diary" project as the basis for an empirical study of interpretative itineraries used by visitors to this curated collection of sound art works. The preliminary results, we thought, were valuable to theorists and artists of electronic literature seeking to engage readers with virtual, online, or curated installations of electronic literature.

Presentation at DHSI Colloquium 1

Presentation. International. Peer reviewed (2016)
Published abstracts
"Digital Storytelling for Digital Humanities" presented at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute Colloquium, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada, 8 June 2016. I suggested digital storytelling might be a useful tool for DH scholarship and pedagogy. As a collision / collusion between the ancient traditions of orality and the instant information access of mass communication systems, and with its broad range of practices, digital storytelling can be used to explore new ways of perceiving and interacting with stories in spaces that otherwise would be out of reach.

Essay Published in Cogent Arts & Humanities

Essay. Peer reviewed (2016)
Digital Storytelling: New Opportunities for Humanities Scholarship and Pedagogy published in the international, peer-reviewed, digital, open access journal Cogent Arts & Humanities, 6 May 2016. This essay outlines the promise and challenges of digital storytelling. The desired outcome is engaging storytelling experiences in support of Digital Humanities scholarship and pedagogy.

Graduation Stories

Sound art. 11'16" (2016)
An oral history produced during the 2016 Washington State University Vancouver graduation ceremony, 7 May 2016, Vancouver, WA. Listen to Graduation Stories.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented Bloody Hands

Community performance. (4 May 2016)
Re-Imagined Radio presented a live re-creation of the radio drama Bloody hands by Willamette Radio Workshop by Willamette Radio Workshop, 4 May 2016, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre and Willamette Radio Workshop investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Presentation at The British Library

Presentation. International. Peer reviewed. (2016)
"Sound: A Literary Memory Media Art Experience" presented at Archival Uncertainties Conference, The British Library, London, England, 4 April 2016. This was part of panel presentation entitled "Challenges to Archiving and Documenting Born Digital Literature: What Scholars, Archivists, and Librarians Need to Know" with Dene Grigar and Kate Pullinger. In my presentation, I suggested that understanding the process of creating a radio drama, listeners are better positioned to appreciate the cultural, historical, and experiential contexts of the sounds to which they are listening. The result: increased opportunities for public outreach, sharing, and scholarship. I used my re-imagined radio project, where I re-create vintage radio dramas for live audiences, as an example.

Interviewed for techne_lab Podcast

Interview. Invited. (2016)
A conversation with Internet artist and writer Mark Amerika, alongside Boulder Creek, Boulder, Colorado, excerpted in EP4: Narrative Currents, the fourth edition of the techne_lab podcast, 31 March 2016. Amerika and I talk about sound-rich narratives. Led by Mark Amerika and PhD candidate Ryan Ruelhen, techne_lab works in conjunction with the doctoral program in Intermedia Art, Writing and Performance (IWAP) at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The purpose is to create and collect experimental dialogues focused on practice-based research and archive them asphilosophical source materials for future forms of post-production art. Each podcast episode features voices of artist-educators affiliated with IWAP. LEARN more.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented Sorry, Wrong Number and The Hitchhiker

Community performance. (23 March 2016)
Re-Imagined Radio presented a live re-creation of the radio dramas Sorry, Wrong Number and The Hitchhiker by Willamette Radio Workshop, 23 March 2016, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre and Willamette Radio Workshop investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Radio Art Broadcast in Boulder, Colorado

Radio art broadcast. Invited. (2016)
Tell Me A Story was broadcast during the Shadowtrash Astral Sleepover Party, a 48-hour continuous broadcast by KVCU 1190AM Radio, Boulder, Colorado, 22-24 March. The unconventional sonic expressions scheduled were designed to turn the radio station into, simultaneously, an instrument and an event.

Essay Published in Digital Humanities Quarterly

Essay. Peer reviewed. (2016)
Sound and Digital Humanities: Reflecting on a DHSI course published in Digital Humanities Quarterly, 10 March 2016. Sound and aural representation of information is an important new area for Digital Humanities. Interested scholars and researchers may not know how to proceed. This essay recounts the "Sound of and in Digital Humanities" course I taught at Digital Humanities Summer Institute in 2014, and how the outcomes furthered the research and practice of both participants and myself. The upshot of this applied focus is to offer insight into the role sound might play in the field of Digital Humanities.

Essay Accepted for Leonardo Electronic Almanac

Essay. Peer reviewed. (2016)
"Sound Curation by Re-creation: The War of the Worlds radio (re)broadcast, Martians with Mustaches," was accepted for publication in an upcoming special issue of Leonardo Electronic Almanac focusing on Histories, Theories and Practices of Sound Curating.

Update

This essay was published in Leonardo Electronic Almanac, vol. 22, no. 3, Dec. 2018. LEARN more.

Artist Talks Delivered

Artist talks. Invited. (2016)
"Experiential Qualities of Sound as Art, Practice, and Research Methodology," an artist talk about my sound art creative practice, presented for two classes of the Interdisciplinary Media Art Practices: digital art program within Department of Art and Art History at the University of Colorado-Boulder, 29 February 2016.

Sound Art Work Selected for Earlid Exhibition

Sound art. International. Peer reviewed (2016)
My archival website
We Can See Edith by Radio was selected for the second annual Liminal Sounds exhibition at Earlid, 4 February-4 May 2016. This work responds to the question, "What is the audible form—the sound—of the intermediary, and what does this entity (person, myth, animal) herald?"

Water, Waves, Dreams Broadcast on Framework Radio

Radio art broadcast. International. Juried. (2016)
My archival website
My radio art, Water, Waves, Dreams, was broadcast on framework radio.net as episode #542, 31 January-6 February 2016. This work of radio art explores sounds of water, waves, and dreams through soundscapes, field recordings, and phonography. The work utilizes student projects from my Internet Radio course, and my own recordings. Featuring juried work by international sound artists, Framework Radio presents not only the extremely diverse sound environments of our world, but also the extremely diverse work produced by the artists who choose to use these environments as their sonic sources.

Presentation at INKE Conference

Presentation. International. Peer reviewed. (2016)
"Curation by Re-Creation: Innovative, New Knowledge Model for Classic Radio Drama" presented at the INKE (Implementing New Knowledge Environments) conference, 19-20 January 2016, Whistler, BC, Canada. I described my "Re-Imagined Radio" project (a partnership with Kiggins Theatre and the Willamette Radio Workshop) as an innovative, new knowledge model for collaborative scholarly production that is both multimodal and participatory, a context for engagement with sounds continually curated by their re-creation.

2015 News

Re-Imagined Radio Presented A Radio Christmas Carol

Community performance. (16 Dec. 2015)
Re-Imagined Radio presented a live re-creation of the radio drama A Radio Christmas Carol by Willamette Radio Workshop, 16 December 2015, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre and Willamette Radio Workshop investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented The Fall of the City and R.U.R.

Community performance. (7 October 2015)
Re-Imagined Radio presented a live re-creation of the radio dramas The Fall of the City and R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots) by Willamette Radio Workshop, 7 October 2015, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre and Willamette Radio Workshop investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Presentations at Electronic Literature Organization Conference

Presentations. Peer reviewed. (2015)
I delivered two peer reviewed presentations at the Electronic Literature Organization 2015 Conference, Bergen, Norway, 5-7 August 2015. First was "Intermediality and Electronic Literature," a roundtable discussion with Caitlin Fisher, Samantha Gorman, Dene Grigar, and James O'Sullivan, exploring electronic literature as an intermedial practice, looking at the topic from a wide range of forms including literature, performance, sound, computation, visual art, and physical computing. My focus was sound as the basis for new forms of electronic literature. Second was "Live performance, voicescapes, and remixing the under language: sounds and voices at the end(s) of electronic literature," a panel with Roger Dean and Hazel Smith, presented three approaches, sound composition, digital manipulation of voice, and remixing of sound files from lost or difficult to access early works of electronic literature, in theory and practice, for the use of sound as the basis for new forms of electronic literature.

Sound art included in field recording workshop

Sound art. 23'00" Peer reviewed (2015)
My sound art work, Tunnel to Another World, was selected by international sound artist Toni Dimitrov for inclusion in his Nature Meets Technology soundscapes and field recordings workshop, Lazerpole, Macedonia, 27-28 June 2015. Tunnel to Another World is a sound art narrative of a dream where one walks to another world via a tunnel. Life passages, changes, fears, release, imagination, and overlay of aural images are all possible interpretations.

Radio Nouspace featured in unplace international virtual museum exhibition

Sound installation. Peer reviewed (2015)
Radio Nouspace was was one of three jury selected artistic projects for inclusion in Unplace Networked Art: Places-between-Places, Lisbon, Portugal, 19 June-19 November 2015. Curated by António Pinto Ribeiro and Rita Xavier Monteiro, with the collaboration of Helena Barranha, Susana S. Martins and Raquel Pereira, the exhibition is promoted by the Gulbenkian Next Future Programme and Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation.

The unplace virtual exhibition is an international project challenging the modes of creation and reception of works of art exhibited in virtual and networked exhibition spaces, a museum without a place, that is nowhere but everywhere. The art works included in this exhibition are examined as in permanent traffic that may appear in the middle of a flow of images, data, graphics, emails, retained or sticking filters, They are subject to accessibility or code protocols, and can be accessed in visual infrastructures or coupled to the real. This versatility puts networked art in a permanent state of mutability and hence is part of its fascination and its relevance.

The unplace exhibition brings together Internet and web-specific artworks in which the tensions between real and virtual spaces are highlighted through online practices ranging from geopoetics, fiction and hacktivism to participatory projects in networked environments. It includes works by Ahmed El Saher (Egypt), Ai Weiwei (China) and Olafur Eliasson (Denmark, Germany), Alfredo Jaar (Chile/USA), Art is Open Source (Italy), Clement Valla (France/USA), Giselle Beiguelman (Brazil), João Paulo Serafim - MIIAC (Portugal), JODI (Belgium/Netherlands), John Barber (USA), Paula Levine (Canada/USA), Thompson & Craighead (UK), Wilfredo Prieto (Cuba), Perry Bard (Canada), Sandra Gamarra (Peru/Spain) & Antoine-Henry Jonquères - LiMac (France/Spain), Hanna Husberg (Finland/Sweden) & Laura McLean (Australia/UK), S.A.R.L. group (Portugal).

Re-Imagined Radio Presented Superman

Community performance. (18 June 2015)
Re-Imagined Radio presented a live radio drama based on Superman of the 1930s-1940s, but with a satirical eye on current issues facing Vancouver, Washington, 18 June 2015, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Local civic leaders voiced the character parts. Undertaken with Kiggins Theatre to investigate radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Presentations at Digital Humanities Summer Institute

Presentations. Peer reviewed (2015)
I delivered two presentations during the Digital Humanities Summer Institute(DHSI), University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, 7-12 June 2015. The first, Digital Radio and Social Knowledge Creation in the Humanities, part of the INKE mini-conference associated with DHSI 2015, argued that future radio, with its contents, transmission, and reception digitized, will promote social knowledge creation through collaborative production and listening experiences that are global in reach yet local in focus. The second presentation, "Radio Nouspace: Sound, Radio, Digital Humanities," placed sound as vocalization of abstract thought at the basis of literature, writing, speaking, and language. I argued that highlighting sound as the basis for narrative and storytelling that is participatory, interactive, and experiential is a worthy goal for digital humanities.

Update

My presentation, "Radio Nouspace: Sound, Radio, Digital Humanities," was expanded and published in Digital Studies/Le champ numérique in October 2017 and republished as part of thematic collection February 2018. LEARN more.

Essay published in The Honest Ulsterman

Publication. Peer reviewed (2015)
My peer reviewed essay Richard Brautigan and So the Wind Won't Blow It All Away was published in The Honest Ulsterman, an internationally recognized literary journal based in Londonderry, Northern Ireland, June 2015. Mystery and mythology align beautifully in Brautigan's novel So The Wind Won't Blow It All Away, mixing fact, fiction, autobiography, and found art to highlight his consistent themes—alienation, loneliness, loss, and death—blurring the boundaries between long and short fiction and poetry more eloquently than in any of his previous writings.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented The Case Files of Dr. Moreau

Community performance. (22 April 2015)
Re-Imagined Radio presented a live re-creation of the radio drama The Case Files of Dr. Moreau, 22 April 2015, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre and Willamette Radio Workshop investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Sound art included in multimedia art exhibition

Sound art. 55'00" (2015)
My archival website
My sound art, Ambient Pulsations, was jury selected for exhibition at Nouspace Gallery, 6 February-6 March 2015, Vancouver, WA, 6 February-6 March 2015. This work explores a universe of pulsating sounds, all without apparent physical sources or material attributes. The inability to visualize sound sources promotes an acousmatic listening experience focused on the act of hearing. As a result, we take interest in sounds for their own merits, refining our listening, thus becoming more aware of our listening variations and subjectivity.

Sound art exhibited in Macedonia

Sound art. 20'00" Peer reviewed (2015)
My archival website
My sound art narrative, The Stranger, was selected for exhibition at the Autonomous Cultural Center, Skopje, Macedonia, curated by Toni Dimitrov. The Stranger is a radio art narrative portraying nearby strangers as rich in their own worlds of experiences and thoughts, all unknown unless I listen to them speaking. Various works are sampled to produce the intended result: an overlay of multiple voices in overheard conversations.

Invited ETCL keynote presentation

Keynote presentation. Invited (2015)
I delivered an invited keynote presentation, "Practice-Based Archiving and Curating Digital Humanities: Three Case Studies," at the Electronic Textual Cultures Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, 22 January 2015. My presentation discussed three Digital Humanities projects: The Brautigan Bibliography and Archive, The Brautigan Library, and Radio Nouspace. Each uses computational technologies, to provide an interface, point of convergence, a place, virtual in nature, but made believable by its resource offerings, where one can access simultaneously a body of work and a cultural context for its historical creation and contemporary consumption.

2014 News

Re-Imagined Radio Presented A Radio Christmas Carol

Community performance. (18 Dec. 2014)
Re-Imagined Radio presented a live re-creation of the radio drama A Radio Christmas Carol, 18 December 2014, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre and Willamette Radio Workshop investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented The War of the Worlds

Community performance. (30 October 2014)
Re-Imagined Radio presented a live re-creation of the radio drama The War of the Worlds, 30 October 2014, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre and Willamette Radio Workshop investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented Around the World in Eighty Days

Community performance. (6 August 2014)
Re-Imagined Radio presented a live re-creation of the radio drama Around the World in Eighty Days, 6 August 2014, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre and Willamette Radio Workshop investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Radio art broadcast, Echoes #4

Radio art. Jury selected (2014)
My archival website
My jury selected radio art, The Stranger, was broadcast on stress.FM as part of the Echoes project, an international radio art festival based in Lisbon, Portugal, 7-8 March 2014. This work was part of Echoes #4: The stranger that is next to me curated by Nuno Torres.

Echoes is a transdisciplinary art project undertaken by the art collective Osso for the city of Lisbon, with a focus on thoughts, experiences, and interventions on the topics of listening and place. Echoes, which "aims to put together thoughts, experiences and interventions on the relationship between LISTENING and PLACE" was presented over four weekends every two months beginning in July 2013 and featured debates, concerts, workshops, soundwalks, film screenings, and radio broadcasts. The common theme was how soundscape and aurality contribute to a sense of place. Echoes #3: What does the Internet sound like? was a collaboration between Echoes and Stress FM, Lisbon, Portugal.

Review published in Leonardo Reviews

Review. (2014)
My review of Memes in Digital Culture by Limor Shifman was published, February 2014.

2013 News

Re-Imagined Radio Presented A Radio Christmas Carol

Community performance. (19 Dec. 2013)
Re-Imagined Radio presented a live re-creation of the radio drama A Radio Christmas Carol, 19 December 2013, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre and Willamette Radio Workshop investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Radio art broadcast, Echoes #3

Radio art. (2013)
My archival website
My jury selected radio art, Internet Soundscape, was broadcast on stress.FM as part of the Echoes project, an international radio art festival based in Lisbon, Portugal, 30 November-1 December 2013. This work was part of Echoes #3: What does the Internet sound like? curated by Nuno Torres.

Echoes is a transdisciplinary art project undertaken by the art collective Osso for the city of Lisbon, with a focus on thoughts, experiences, and interventions on the topics of listening and place. Echoes, which "aims to put together thoughts, experiences and interventions on the relationship between LISTENING and PLACE" was presented over four weekends every two months beginning in July 2013 and featured debates, concerts, workshops, soundwalks, film screenings, and radio broadcasts. The common theme was how soundscape and aurality contribute to a sense of place. Echoes #3: What does the Internet sound like? was a collaboration between Echoes and Stress FM, Lisbon, Portugal.

Re-Imagined Radio Presented The War of the Worlds

Community performance. (30 October 2013)
Re-Imagined Radio presented a live re-creation of the radio drama The War of the Worlds, 30 October 2013, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. Re-Imagined Radio is a research project undertaken with Kiggins Theatre and Willamette Radio Workshop investigating radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

Essay published in radioenegocios, Brazilian radio magazine

Publication. (2013)
My essay, "Internet radio and its future: A classroom experiment" was published as a special feature in radioenegocios (Issue 12, November 2013). The issue focused on the "What is Radio? Exploring the past, present, and future of radio" conference held in Portland, Oregon, 25-27 April (see below) where my students and I discussed our efforts to design and build a collaborative Internet radio context where users are both creators and consumers of the program stream. This article was invited by members of radioenegocios present at the conference. radioenegocios is an online journal focusing on the business and culture of radio based in Brazil and published in Portuguese.

What happens when stories meet mobile media?

Publication. (2013)
My peer reviewed essay, "Walking-Talking: Soundscapes, Flâneurs, and the Creation of Mobile Media Narratives," was published in The Mobile Story: Narrative Practices with Locative Technologies (Ed. Jason Farman. Routledge, 2013), 8 November 2013. This essay imagines a project called "Walking-Talking" that utilizes digital/mobile telephony to produce a sound narrative focused on a particular urban location. While there are previous examples of locative narrative using mobile telephony, Walking-Talking seeks an alternative approach by actively engaging participants in the production as well as the consumption of historical and personal narratives. In that regard, this chapter explores the concepts of soundscape, flâneur, and mobile telephony. The chapter defines and links each of these concepts to the theoretical exploration of hands-on design for narrative engagement with place and community. The mobile telephone becomes a portal between the flâneur/participant and the narratives of the sound environment through which he or she travels. The desired outcome is to provide those wanting to theorize, design, and undertake such a project a better understanding of narrative in a digital/mobile age and its utilization. The book was published in both hardcover and e-book versions. LEARN more at the book's website

Re-Imagined Radio Presented The War of the Worlds

Radio performance. (30 Oct. 2013)
SOLD OUT! We re-imagined the most famous radio broadcast of all time on the occasion of its 75th anniversary. Re-Imagined Radio presented a live re-creation of the radio drama The War of the Worlds by Willamette Radio Workshop, 30 October 2013, at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. The event was part of my Re-Imagined Radio research project, which investigates radio drama as community-facing storytelling. LEARN more.

They're here: Martians with Moustaches

Course project. (2013)
Students from my Digital Storytelling class presented their course projects in a show at Nouspace Gallery & Media Lounge, 30 October-30 November 2013. Entitled "Martians with Moustaches," the exhibition showcased their explorations of transmedia storytelling, with each project focused around the legendary 1938 "War of the Worlds" radio broadcast. Opening night events featured a live reenactment by the Willamette Radio Workshop of the original radio broadcast, on the occasion of its 75th anniversary. Learn more at the project website and through this article in the local paper. Leading up to these events, I was interviewed on the Oregon Public Broadcasting program Think Out Loud.

Presentation at Electronic Literature Organization Conference

Presentation. (2013)
I delivered a peer reviewed presentation, "Internet radio and electronic literature: locating the text in aural narratives," at the Electronic Literature Organization 2013 international conference, "Chercher le texte: locating the text in electronic literature", in Paris, France, 24-27 September 2013, as part of the scientific and scholarly presentations strand. My presentation included a performance of my sound art piece "Where's Waldo? :: Where's the text?" Together, my talk and sound art (re)imagined the cultures of Internet radio and literature as closely connected, even overlapping, providing potential for engaging and immersive electronic literary experiences that locate the text in the art of listening. Read online or download as a .PDF file, also here

Update

Expanded and published as Internet radio and electronic literature: locating the text in the act of listening by electronic book review, May 2014.
An edited version, carrying forward the core elements of my original presentation, but setting aside the expanded discussion of Internet radio and social audio networks included in the original ebr publication, and focusing instead on the central nature of sound(s) to literature and literary endeavors, and thus by extension, to electronic literature, was published in Chercher le texte: ELO 2013 Proceedings, November 2018.

Radio art broadcast, Echoes #2

Radio art. (2013)
My archival website
My jury selected radio art, Paging Greg Lambert, was broadcast on stress.FM as part of the Echoes project, an international radio art festival based in Lisbon, Portugal, 20-23 September 2013. This work was part of Echoes #2: Intermission: Audio portraits of place—Mapping the space between A and B curated by United Kingdom conceptual artist Jennie Savage. Submissions were encouraged to create an audio map that connects sounds to place and then forges connections between places."

Echoes is a transdisciplinary art project undertaken by the art collective Osso for the city of Lisbon, with a focus on thoughts, experiences, and interventions on the topics of listening and place. Echoes, which "aims to put together thoughts, experiences and interventions on the relationship between LISTENING and PLACE" was presented over four weekends every two months beginning in July 2013 and featured debates, concerts, workshops, soundwalks, film screenings, and radio broadcasts. The common theme was how soundscape and aurality contribute to a sense of place. Echoes #2: Intermission was a collaboration between Echoes and Savage for the Lisbon Architecture Treinnale and Stress FM, Lisbon, Portugal.

Between Sleep and Dreams Broadcast on Framework Radio

Radio art. 55'00" (2013)
My archival website
My radio art, Between Sleep and Dreams, was broadcast on framework radio.net as episode #433, 8-15 September 2013. "Between Sleep and Dreams" imagines the enigma of waking, the narratives assimilated by ones (sub)conscious from sounds heard during liminal dreaming as an ongoing acousmatic collage, rising and falling like waves on the surface of perception, difficult to attain, difficult to escape. Featuring juried work by international sound artists, Framework Radio presents not only the extremely diverse sound environments of our world, but also the extremely diverse work produced by the artists who choose to use these environments as their sonic sources.

Review published in Leonardo Reviews

Publication. (2013)
My review of Ethnography and Virtual Worlds by Tom Boellstorff, Bonnie Nardi, Celia Pierce, and T. L. Taylor was published August 2013.

Radio art broadcast, Echoes #1

Publication. (2013)
Three examples of my radio art were jury selected for broadcast on stress.FM as part of the Echoes project, an international radio art festival based in Lisbon, Portugal, 13-14 July 2013. The works, all jury selected, were Ambient Pulsations, Contact, and Between Sleep and Dreams.

Ambient Pulsations (55:00) explores a universe of pulsating sounds, all without apparent physical sources or attributes of materiality. Contact (55:00) is a sound narrative focusing on the proclivity throughout human history to seek connection and communication with the spirit spectrum, parallel dimensions, or alien worlds beyond our own. Between Sleep and Dreams (55:00) imagines the place between waking and sleep, the time of troubled dreams, the place where dreaming melds seamlessly with other narratives.

Echoes is a transdisciplinary program undertaken by the art collective Osso for the city of Lisbon, with a focus on thoughts, experiences, and interventions on the topics of listening and place. The project is presented over four weekends every two months beginning in July 2013 when debates, concerts, workshops, soundwalks, film screenings, and radio broadcasts will occur. These works were selected as part of the first weekend radio broadcast focusing on "topographies and geographies, and social and cultural narratives through poetic imagination, arising the possibility for a deeper commitment with the landscape, the architectural space and the community."

Course Taught at Digital Humanities Summer Institute

Teaching. (2013)
Faculty of The Creative Media & Digital Culture Program (CMDC) taught a week-long course, "Creating Digital Humanities Projects for the Mobile Environment," for the Digital Humanities Summer Institute, University of Victoria, BC, Canada, 6-10 June 2013. Faculty included myself, Dene Grigar, Brett Oppegaard, Will Luers, Nicholas Schiller, and Brenda Grell. My role was the module on "Usability and Interface Design for Mobile Devices." The course goals were to help participants: 1) conceptualize the space and special features of mobile devices; 2) develop the architecture, design, and multimedia content production for a mobile project; and 3) understand the coding and programming requirements for mobile devices. Participants learned how to create projects for the mobile environment and completed steps toward the development of their own projects.

Radio art featured in Fogo Island radio arts festival

Radio art. (2013)
My archival website
A prototype of my sound+radio art work, Between Sleep and Dreams, was broadcast as part of the Cough+Sniff Radio Arts Festival, Fogo Island, Newfoundland, Canada, 6-7 April 2013. The broadcast was powered by two small transmitters located on the island, both programmed with selected content from international and local contributors.

Presentation at "What Is Radio?" conference

Presentation. (2013)
Program here
I presented my peer reviewed presentation, "Internet Radio: Radio after the future," at the What is Radio? Exploring the past, present, and future of radio conference, hosted by the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication, 25-27 April 2013. I suggested that future radio, with its transmission, contents, and reception digitized, will be available through a variety of mobile devices anywhere an Internet connection is established. Given the interactivity afforded by this context, future radio may encourage its participants/listeners to interrupt/influence/customize the program stream, converse/collaborate with each other, thus making future radio a many-to-many, non-linear, experience. In short, future radio may be mobile, non-linear, shared, social, collaborative—an audio network providing global reach even while its focus remains local. With a seemingly endless palate of programming opportunities I focused on two that seemed especially interesting for research and practice associated with the new nature of Internet radio: radio drama and radio art. In this context, radio of the future, I argued, may focus on collecting, collating, connecting, contextualizing, and curating fulfilling experiences between participants and content(s). Students from my DTC 338 Internet Radio Theories and Practice course, joined me, and to be honest, it was their comments and presentations of their work that won the day at the conference. Read online or download as a .PDF file

Essay published in Harlot

Publication. (2013)
My peer reviewed essay, Audiobiography: A sonic memoir of the 1960s, was published in Issue #9: Sonic Rhetorics of Harlot: A revealing look at the arts of persuasion, an interactive digital magazine dedicated to exploring rhetoric in everyday life, April 2013. The essays included numerous sound files, which were, in reality, the subject of the essay: rhetoric that shaped my life during the 1960s. The text explained my reactions.

Tech 101 workshop delivered

Teaching / service. (2013)
I delivered a workshop, "QR Codes: Connecting the Local to Online Media," as part of the #nextchapter initiative, Vancouver, WA, 9 March 2013. Theme: In Chapter 2 of his book, Program or Be Programmed: Ten Commands for the Digital Age, Douglas Rushkoff says, ". . . digital media are biased away from the local, and toward dislocation" (43) and ". . .the net is better at creating simulations and approximations of human interaction from great distance than it is at fostering interactions between people in the same place" (44). This workshop suggested that QR (Quick Response) codes can be used to mitigate this bias of digital media. Examples were provided and participants were taught multiple ways to make and utilize QR codes to promote local interaction between their businesses and/or creative endeavors and interested local people.

#nextchapter is Vancouver, Washington's community-wide reading and conversation program designed to stimulate innovation and opportunities through deeper understanding of the most compelling cultural trends of the emerging digital economy. This year the focus is on Program or Be Programmed: Ten Commands for the Digital Age by Douglas Rushkoff (OR Press, New York, 2010). Eight workshops and two public lectures (delivered by Rushkoff) provide the public opportunities to learn how to manage and control common apps and tools of the digital medium. Workshops are taught by faculty of The Creative Media & Digital Culture Program (CMDC) at Washington State University Vancouver.

The community read concept began with an idea among CMDC faculty to promote a focused "program read" in all our courses. Only 148 pages, Program or Be Programmed: Ten Commands for a Digital Age would not, we thought, be daunting for first-year students, nor faculty who already have a full plate. And, its message of careful analysis and evaluation seems to speak directly to the underlying "think, learn, build" philosophical and pedagogical structures of the CMDC program.

Rushkoff posits ten biases of digital technologies, each stemming from the tendency to promote one set of behaviors over another. He devotes a chapter to each bias, and discusses how to turn these liabilities into opportunities, suggesting how to balance each bias with the needs of real people using that technology to live and work in both physical and virtual spaces, sometimes simultaneously.

Rushkoff argues that we need to understand how digital technologies are programmed, and for what purposes. In short, learn to program our digital technologies or be programmed by them. "[Digital technologies] are not just objects, but systems embedded with purpose. They act with intention, If we don't now how they work, we won't even know what they want. The less involved and aware we are of the way our technologies are programmed and program themselves, the more narrow our choices will become; the less we will be able to envision alternatives to the pathways described by our programs; and the more our lives and experiences will be dictated by their biases. On the other hand, the more humans become involved in their design, the more humanely inspired these tools will end up behaving" (142-143).

We planned for one or more chapters from this book to be incorporated into each of our classes. Projects or workshops would be developed around the ideas the book explores, and the semester would conclude with a visit and lecture by Rushkoff. We believed this an excellent opportunity to connect our courses and provide some thought-provoking ideas to the campus community. Little did we know the idea would go viral and grow to include the entire city!

I reviewed this book in the March 2012 issue of Leonardo Reviews. Read it here.

Review published in Leonardo Reviews

Publication. (2013)
My review of Waves by Fredric Raichlen was published, February 2013.

Ambient Pulsations Broadcast on Framework Radio

Radio art. 55'00" (2013)
My archival website
My radio art, Ambient Pulsations, was broadcast on framework radio.net as episode #405, 28 January-3 February 2013. Ambient Pulsations explores a universe of pulsating sounds, all without apparent physical sources or attributes of materiality. This inability to visualize sound sources promotes an acousmatic listening experience focused on the act of hearing. As a result, we take interest in sounds for their own merits, refining our listening through repeated listening, thus becoming more aware of our listening variations and subjectivity. Featuring juried work by international sound artists, Framework Radio presents not only the extremely diverse sound environments of our world, but also the extremely diverse work produced by the artists who choose to use these environments as their sonic sources.

(inter)National Unpublished Writers' Day

Community service. (2013)
National Unpublished Writers' Day (NUWD) was celebrated today, 27 January 2013, with ten "creation stations" spread throughout the galleries of the Clark County Historical Museum. Each station was staffed by a volunteer, someone interested enough in some aspect of writing to spend five hours sitting at a table willing to talk with anyone about their interest. One hundred people attended the event, keeping each creation station busy throughout the event.

This year we were joined by The Brautigan Book Club (based in the United Kingdom) who produced and contributed a zine and an audio compilation, both featuring members responding to Brautigan's works. As a result, the event has become (inter)National Unpublished Writers' Day.

It is quite an undertaking to develop the momentum, wrangle volunteers, solicit support, interest the press, and coordinate the event. Some asked me today, "Why do it? What's the purpose? What's the payback?" Easy answers are that NUWD celebrates the legacy of Washington-born author Richard Brautigan, whose 1971 novel, The Abortion: An Historical Romance 1966 inspired The Brautigan Library, an interactive exhibit of over 300 manuscripts from writers around the world on permanent display at the Museum. Brautigan felt that individual voice, and world vision, expressed through writing was important and he envisioned a mechanism for such voices to be preserved.

I also answered that NUWD celebrates Brautigan's vision by encouraging participants to write and record their thoughts, feelings, memories, and ideas regardless of topic or quality of writing. The traditional publication route is not available for this type of writing, but then again, it is not needed. Unpublished writers participating in NUWD do not need a publisher. They need only the assurance that their voice is valuable, and perhaps some tips and techniques on how to make it more effective.

But today, I was struck with the idea that what NUWD, and the library it signifies, is really about is the collection and preservation of knowledge. Each manuscript we encourage someone to write, and then later collect in The Brautigan Library, adds to the body of knowledge available for the future. Each manuscript is an individual time capsule, waiting to be opened, its contents spilled out under the gaze of a reader. Sure, the topics may seem silly, and the writing doggerel, but each represents a personal vision of accumulated wisdom that has no other outlet, anywhere, any way. A library should have a vision and a policy for collecting such wisdom, and then making it available for others. That's the focus of National Unpublished Writers' Day, not to get someone published, but to encourage them to share their wisdom. This happened throughout the day around the various creation stations and it was exciting to be part of the experience.

The Brautigan Library: online narratives

Scholarship. (16 January 2013)
The Brautigan Library seeks to provide an online home for unpublished manuscripts of authors keen to share their narratives. Digitization of these manuscripts promotes many opportunities for sharing, and trouble. I am thinking that if we do not edit or moderate the content of submitted manuscripts, we are not liable. Rather than control over publishing, I can let users/patrons promote good content. Bad content will be pushed to the background. Engaged readers will decide the focus of the content. Other thoughts and questions . . .
Delivery mechanisms come and go; they tend not to go away. But, what are the devices for access?
What trends and audience behavior are the best predictors of the future?
A shift away from delivery mechanisms and toward different mechanisms of telling a story promotes us to think about how we might use multimedia—images, video, sound—in order to tell stories in different media, or in different ways
What decisions do we make with regard to stories that entertain, solve problems, present information, teach a process, persuade a point of view, or argue a point?
In the end, don't be stupid. Don't do anything to bring disrepute to yourself or organization.

See the book Participatory Journalism: Guarding Open Gates at Online Newspapers (Jane Singer, et. al., Wiley-Blackwell, 2011).

2012 News

Appearance in Harper's magazine

Interview. (2012)
I was interviewed in June for this article, "Man Underwater: The Democratic Fiction of Richard Brautigan," which appeared in the December 2012 issue of Harper's magazine (pages 76-80). Although not unkind, the article is not particularly friendly toward The Brautigan Library. I am quoted a few times.

Tell Me A Story about Meditation Broadcast on Framework Radio

Radio art. (2012)
My archival website
My radio art, Tell Me A Story about Meditation, was broadcast on framework radio.net as episode #389, 23-30 September 2012. Tell Me A Story about Meditation revisits two earlier works, Tell Me A Story and Meditation and utilizes sampling, found and/or environmental sound artifacts, field recordings, phonography, soundscapes, and acousmatic compositions to create a remixed narrative of the moment, especially as that moment might involve thoughtful (meditative?) listening. Featuring juried work by international sound artists, Framework Radio presents not only the extremely diverse sound environments of our world, but also the extremely diverse work produced by the artists who choose to use these environments as their sonic sources.

Review published in Leonardo Reviews

Publication. (2012)
My review of The Oxford Handbook of Sound Studies edited by Trevor Pinch and Karin Bijsterveld was published, September 2012.

Meditation Broadcast on Framework Radio

Radio art. 23:16 (2012)
My archival website
Portions of my radio art, Meditation, was broadcast on framework radio as part of episode #386, a compilation featuring work by multiple international sound artists, 4 September 2012. Meditation is a narrative about the diversity of mediation, especially as it might be practiced through thoughtful listening. Featuring juried work by international sound artists, Framework Radio presents not only the extremely diverse sound environments of our world, but also the extremely diverse work produced by the artists who choose to use these environments as their sonic sources.

Reviews republished in Leonardo Reviews eBook

Publications. (2012)
Seven reviews previously published in Leonardo Reviews were collected and republished in a Kindle eBook version of Leonardo Reviews Quarterly 2.01 by MIT Press (ASIN B008JG7DAM), 24 July 2012. The eBook project is a collaboration between Leonardo, The International Society for the Arts, Sciences, and Technology, and the MIT Press. The collaboration strives to provide critical content through a series of scholarly publications focused on interdisciplinary work, creative output, and innovation. The reviews are
"Television as Digital Media" by James Bennett and Niki Strange (eds.)
"How to Do Things with Videogames" by Ian Bogost
"Gaming Matters: Art, Science, Magic, and the Computer Game Medium" by Judd Ethan Ruggil and Ken S. McAllister
"Program or Be Programmed: Ten Commandments for a Digital Age" by Douglas Rushkoff
"Talk to Me: Design and Communication between People and Objects" by Paola Antonelli
"Acoustic Territories: Sound Culture and Everyday Life" by Brandon LaBelle
"Transmission Arts: Artists and Airwaves" by Galen Joseph-Hunter, Penny Duff, and Maria Papadomanolaki (eds.)

These reviews stem from my work as a member of the reviews panel for Leonardo Reviews, an international panel of scholars and professionals invited from a wide range of disciplines to review books, exhibitions, DVDs, CDs, websites, and conferences for the purpose of engaging with the emergent debates and manifestations that are the consequences of the convergence of the arts, science, and technology. Information about this publication at the Amazon website

Contact Broadcast on Framework Radio

Radio art. 55'00" (2012)
My archival website
My radio art, Contact, was broadcast on framework radio.net as episode #381, 1-8 July 2012. Contact focuses on the proclivity throughout human history to seek connection and communication with the spirit spectrum, parallel dimensions, or alien worlds beyond our own universe. Radio waves, with their ability to traverse the ether of atmosphere and space may be one medium that can make such connection. Using acousmatic compositions, phonography, field recordings, and sampling, Contact imagines such a radio broadcast and what might be heard. Featuring juried work by international sound artists, Framework Radio presents not only the extremely diverse sound environments of our world, but also the extremely diverse work produced by the artists who choose to use these environments as their sonic sources.

Sound art installation at Electronic Literature Organization media art show

Sound art. 9'04" (2012)
My sound art, Sounds of My Life :: A Sixties Radio Narrative, was jury selected for inclusion in an exhibition themed "Electrifying Literature: Affordances and Constraints" in conjunction with The Electronic Literature Organization international conference, 13-23 June 2012.

The Sounds of My Life :: A Sixties Radio Narrative installation consists of a 1960s portable radio outfitted with an Arduino sound player and a looping MP3 recording, and seeks to provide a personal narrative of the politics, civil rights, space exploration, counterculture movement, and popular culture during "The Sixties," a time of intense social, political, and cultural change. Rather than an authoritative narrator's vision, this work is constructed from recordings of the persons or events depicted, edited to focus attention on the liminal moment. It combines oral history, field recordings, soundscapes, found sounds, appropriation, cut ups, sound effects, and historical recordings. Aural elements simulate the passage of years or changing radio stations / chapters in the overall narrative. Not a typical radio documentary, nor a narrated history, the result is instead a narrative that remixes the medium of its original telling, empowering listeners to combine the sounds heard with their personal lived experience to create a meaningful experience.

During its installation at the exhibit, the work sought to provide listeners / participants a chronological acousmatic context in which to consider the literary relevance of historical, political, rhetorical, and cultural experiences seemingly, at first glance, far removed from traditionally accepted aspects / definition(s) of literature, but, upon closer examination / listening / reading, quite evocative of a multivalent, emerging electronic literature.

Course at Digital Humanities Summer Institute

Teaching. (2012)
Faculty of The Creative Media & Digital Culture Program (CMDC) taught a week-long course, "Creating Digital Humanities Projects for the Mobile Environment," for the Digital Humanities Summer Institute, University of Victoria, BC, Canada, this week. Faculty included myself, Dene Grigar, Brett Oppegaard, Will Luers, Nicholas Schiller, and Aaron May. My role was the module on "Usability and Interface Design for Mobile Devices."

This invitation resulted from the success of the Mobile Tech Research Initiative Summer 2011, offered by The Creative Media & Digital Culture Program at Washington State University Vancouver. This 12-week-long series of courses and workshops resulted in students building a functional iPhone app for Dick Hannah Dealerships, in Vancouver.

Sound art installation included in month-long exhibition

Sound art. (2012)
My archival website
My sound art, Sounds of My Life :: A Sixties Radio Narrative was jury selected for an exhibition entitled Loud & Clear: Sound & Image at North Bank Artists Gallery in downtown Vancouver, WA, 6-28 April 2012. More than 600 people attended the event, making it the largest ever opening at the gallery. The month-long show, conceived and curated by students from The Creative Media & Digital Culture Program (CMDC) features electronic music, sound art, and digital visual art.

The idea for the show was conceived in January, during the return trip from The Modern Language Association (MLA) convention in Seattle. Two students, Setareh Alizadeh and Nicole Buckner, said they wanted to curate an art show for students in the CMDC program. Both had worked as docents for the electronic literature exhibit the CMDC program hosted at the MLA convention and wanted more experience. So, they developed a focus on digital sound and video art produced as part of the experimental music and sound art class scheduled for the spring semester. They made all the arrangements for use of the North Bank Artists Gallery in downtown Vancouver for a month-long show. They developed the call for submissions. They solicited the peer review jury and volunteers to work as docents during the month. They developed and launched a website and social media promotional events. And they distributed press releases to the traditional regional media outlets. They started alone, but inspired a number of other students to join them along the way. Their success will be evident over the next month.

Four reviews published in Leonardo Reviews

Publication. (2012)
Leonardo Reviews published four of my reviews, February 2012.
Acoustic Territories: Sound Culture and Everyday Life by Brandon LaBelle
Gaming Matters: Art, Science, Magic, and the Computer Game Medium by Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister
How to Do Things with Video Games by Ian Bogost
Talk to Me: Design and the Communication between People and Ojbects by Paola Antonelli

LaBelle, an artist and writer working with sound and locational identities, argues that sound provides a significant model for thinking about and experiencing the contemporary condition. In particular, LaBelle is interested in the ways in which sound disintegrates and reconfigures space through a political process, turning them into acoustic territories. To analyze such territories, LaBelle focuses on five everyday spaces: the urban underground subway; home interiors, suburbs, prisons, and gated communities; urban sidewalks and streets; shopping malls and airports; and the sky, filled with television and radio transmissions, both commercial and pirate. In examining each space, LaBelle foregrounds sound as an anxious and restless transfiguration that "might identify a means for occupying and exploring the multiple perspectives of the present" (xxvi). In the end, the dynamic quality of auditory knowledge works to create shared spaces that belong to no single public yet still impart the feeling of intimacy, says LaBelle. Sound then is a network that "teaches us to belong, to find place, as well as how not to belong, to drift. . . . based on empathy and divergence, allowing for careful understanding and deep involvement in the present while connecting to the dynamics of mediation, displacement, and virtuality" (xvii).

Review published in Leonardo Reviews

Publication. (2012)
My review of Television as Digital Media, James Bennett and Niki Strange, editors, was published, January 2012.

Interviewed for Allan Frost Library

Interview. (2012)
An interview with Allen Frost, a librarian at Western Washington University was published 16 January 2012 in his blog as "Speaking of Richard Brautigan". Allen contacted me regarding my work with Brautigan.NET.

2011 News

Two presentations at IDMA

Presentations. (2011)
I delivered two peer reviewed presentations at the International Digital Media and Arts Association (IDMAA) conference, 13-15 October 2011. The first "Mobile App Design" was a panel with my colleagues Dene Grigar, Brett Oppegaard, Will Luers, Michael Rabby, and Aaron May. We shared information about curriculum design, class projects and activities, classroom organization, business partnerships, emerging perspectives of app aesthetics, technical requirements, teaching resources, and best practices for teaching and learning app design and development harvested from the Mobile Tech Research Initiative Summer 2011, part of The Creative Media & Digital Culture Program at Washington State University Vancouver. Panel handout.

The second presentation, "Thoughts Toward Situation-Centered Mobile App Design," was an individual presentation focusing on small-screen, situation-centered user experience, succinct content, functionality, and medium affordances, trying to add to a developing body of knowledge regarding mobile app user experience.

The IDMAA conference, with its theme "Design, Innovation & Story: An Odyssey of Confluence," was held at the Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Georgia.